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Food from the 50s

{{forumThread.upVotes}} Created by Steve Greenwood 3 May 2012 13:37 8144 views Link  
Steve Greenwood 3 May 2012 13:37
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Originally Posted by
Food from the 50s

I asked my wife if she remembered any food that she liked from the 1950s. She then pointed out that she wasnt born until 1945 and had little memory of any kind of food from that period. So I shut up and started to think of what I remembered. Like most on these forums money wasnt plentiful so we often had the basics like mince and potatoes or fish and chips (why do they taste different nowadays?). Many things were still rationed in the early 50s but it was a challenge to our parents to give us enough to eat, and a balanced diet wasnt in the running. At school dinners I still remember frogs spawn and cabbage that had been cooked to within an inch of its life and came to the plate soggy and tasteless. Jumping forward to the latter end of the 50s having joined the R.N. I was introduced to many new dishes, one of which was belly pork!! To this day I still love the taste and flavour of this cheap cut of meat.
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Mike Pass 3 May 2012 14:36
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Originally Posted by
Hhhmmm!!!!

Steve, I am a little surprised that, if your wife was born in 45 she has little memory of food of the 50s (mind you it was not the era of the gastronome, was it!). I was born in 52 and have distinct memories of the aforementioned, mainly because variety was not excessive and money was scarce. I too, still have nightmares about the frogspawn. Was that revolting or what! However, no, I am not a weirdo but I enjoyed that school cabbage. I still smell it at times. The Corn Flake tart was a favourite of mine at school and chips were never served at any school that I attended! At home...well, what can I say. Not unlike most folk that I knew, money literally was gold dust and every economy was made. A regular dish of mine was an enamel bowl (you will recall the yellowish main body with the green turnover rim?!) of baked beans with a boiled egg alfloat in them. One of my sustaining meals consisted of bread and beef dripping. I hesitate to complain about this given that I still search high and low to obtain spreadable beef dripping. I could happily live on it. No chocolate of course, except at Easter. I, when the pennies permitted was a fan of the Sherbet dip, the colour changing rock hard lolly, Spanish Gold sweet tobacco and strange sweet eggs which were hollow and had the look and consistency of fibre glass. Sunday dinner was always chicken! Just reading that back......do not accuse me diverting to the how hard we had it premise. I admit that it does look a little like that but that is not the intention and I am simply recalling the food of the time as per the topic.
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Nobby 3 May 2012 15:03
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Originally Posted by
There seems to be a universal dislike of Sago pudding, although I can recall it only occasionally as we couldnt afford school dinners every day! Semolina was worse I thought, especially when it include raisins or a lump of jam in the middle. I can recall to this day being the very last person sitting in the school dining room because I hadnt eaten what was on my plate, and being threatened with [youll never get curly hair if you dont eat [insert something dreadful here]" I always won in the end because they ran out of time. To this day I will not eat certain foods: mashed potatoes with lumps in them being one [although mine never have lumps!] There was another culinary delight called Bakewell Tart, and well baked it was, like a paving slab...with solid set jam in it. Of course none of the schools I attended actually cooked anything: it all arrived from somewhere else in [allegedly] hot containers. As for meat: did we ever have meat at school? I cant remember, not even sausages.
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Mike Pass 3 May 2012 16:00
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Originally Posted by
Hhhmmm!!!

Now I did like Semolina!
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..... 3 May 2012 16:16
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Originally Posted by
My missus just asked me what i was laughing out loud at and i told her its the replies to the 50s question. Yes the Cabbage was vile, yes the "Frogspawn" was disgusting and the Tart with jam was ok. unless you were given a corner which was all Pastry that would not be out of place in a wall. As Colin says The food was cooked elsewhere and brought sometimes at 12oclock and the next week 1.30. Though my experience was mid 40s onwards it sounds as though things did not improve into the 50s. More please (Never said that in those days)
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Who Does Guard The Guardians?? 3 May 2012 16:46
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Originally Posted by
My school meal experience ran from mid 40s to 1952, all the meals I had were cooked in the school kitchen, the place always, and I mean always had the aroma of boiled cabbage, we had a variety of meals, but always on a weekly rota, same meal same day each week, two days I always tried to miss ,were the days we had grated carrot and beetroot as the veg, the mashed tatty always had hard lumps and the greens other than peas were al-a-dente, custard always had white flecks in it???? And the pud was usually a sponge of some unknown manufacture And egg with the meal was always scrambled from powder. The reason chips had a different flavour is because they were fried in lard . At home we had rabbit as the main meat, because of rationing, stewed, baked, stuffed or braised, three days each week, even today my stomach turns at the thought of a rabbit meal. Tapioca was one of my favourite puds, frog spawn was not a delight to me. Beef dripping or home made lard, on toast with salt and pepper, sheer bliss, I also enjoyed home made rice-pud to which had been added a tin of condensed milk, also enjoyed home made custard with a dollop of strawberry jam dunked in the middle, I think that's all for now, best stop before I get on a roll.
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Marie Drew 3 May 2012 17:13
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Originally Posted by
Fridays, dreaded Fridays, as the school meal was often cheese pie and I intensely disliked anything that looked, smelt or tasted of cheese at that time. These days cheese is my downfall unfortunately. There was a prefect on each table who insisted that we cleared our plates and woe betide anyone who didnt. Prefects had power
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Sit Vis Nobiscum. 3 May 2012 17:19
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Originally Posted by
My memories of 50s food is home good, school diners not so good to awful, as my father owned a grocers shop, the home food was plentiful. School was a different experience altogether, it put me off fish for many years, beef was fairly common, chicken at school never as it was too expensive, i seem to remember boiled or mashed spuds with everything, the puds werent too bad, except that custard could vary in consistency from exceeding thin to the viscosity of plaster with the ability to set solid, returning a plate with food on it was classed as a sin, punishable by being sent back to the table and being force fed if necessary, with the accompanying words like, " theres starving children who would love a meal like that". Fortunately I did not suffer school dinners as I lived round the corner from the school,
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Syd Jones 3 May 2012 18:04
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Originally Posted by
As a child, back in the thirties, school dinners hadn't been invented, but a real winter treat was to arrange the milk bottles inside the guard of the coke bogie stove which heated the classrooms. Warm milk at morning break, bliss! Occasionally the milk was already frozen when it went in and went everywhere when it thawed. Sometimes the bottles would be too close to the stove and then they simply exploded! Some little pigs would craftilly move their mates bottles closer to the stove just to make it happen! A real treat at home, if beef ever appeared for the Sunday dinner, was to dip a piece of bread into the fat while the meat was in the oven, soft slurpy and hot. Manna from Heaven! In the sixties, we tried to introduce our kids to the delight of beef dripping and were howled out of the home! School meals appeared in the forties and rapidly became 'British Restaurants.' Cheese savoury was the staple and the cheapest, cabbage was invariably rendered down to a splodge and since my mother  treated it the same, it was many years before I learned that there was any other way!. 'Frogspawn' was fairly edible though, if a dollop of jam went with it.  The cooks were a breed unto themselves and Lord help any juvenile who failed to clear his plate. Cheers, Syd. Last edited by Syd Jones
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Mike Pass 3 May 2012 18:19
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Originally Posted by
Hhhmmm!!!!

Well, what a bunch of wimps!!!! School cabbage was bostin...................... My mother used to make Apple dumpling quite often as in.....A pan of stewed fresh apples with a three inch layer of dumpling on top. Favourite pudding for years. I also grew up on liver sandwiches and still have those every couple of weeks. I have noticed a couple of other posts featuring Beef dripping. Have you any idea how difficult it is buy these days? I do not mean the hard cuttable type in a packet. I would be sent to the Co-op for 1/2lb each week. They would scoop it out of a massive pan and slop it down onto white paper wrap. It would not have been complete without the jelly gravy though! Thinking on, it was probably a good thing that I was not sent for bread at the same time as dripping. An empty wrapping would not have gone down to well back home!
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..... 3 May 2012 18:38
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: Mike Pass Well, what a bunch of wimps!!!! School cabbage was bostin'...................... My mother used to make Apple dumpling quite often as in.....A pan of stewed fresh apples with a three inch layer of dumpling on top. Favourite pudding for years. I also grew up on liver sandwiches and still have those every couple of weeks. I have noticed a couple of other posts featuring Beef dripping. Have you any idea how difficult it is buy these days? I do not mean the hard cuttable type in a packet. I would be sent to the Co-op for 1/2lb each week. They would scoop it out of a massive pan and slop it down onto white paper wrap. It would not have been complete without the jelly gravy though! Thinking on, it was probably a good thing that I was not sent for bread at the same time as dripping. An empty wrapping would not have gone down to well back home! Mike. When i visit Family in Leeds we always call at shop called Wilsons, they still make and sell Beef dripping with the brown in the bottom of the carton. It is wonderful and reminds me of having it many years ago. If you like when i go again in August i will get you a carton but you will have to meet me on the M.6 or the M.42. All you will need is fresh bread, this is Manna from heaven. Anybody else want some as i already bring plenty back with me.
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Cave Adsum 3 May 2012 18:41
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Originally Posted by
food from the fifties

I seem to remember lots of suet puddings - steak & kidney, Bacon roly poly, plum duff when my RN uncle came to stay, then there was treacle tart, a mixture of breadcrumbs & golden syrup in a solid pastry case. Only had chicken at Easter & Christmas. Mothers home made brawn (from a pigs head) was delicious, I still have the 7lb weight she used to press it. Rabbit was quite common for us and I was taught how to skin the things at an early age. A large tin loaf of fresh bread was 10d. and usually still warm when we took it home. As others have said, thickly smeared with beef dripping, salt & pepper - kept the cold out on the 2 mile walk to school!
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Little Mo 3 May 2012 20:21
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Originally Posted by
We must have had reasonable cooks at our school as i enjoyed my school meals and i love frogspawn, i still eat it now but have to make it for myself as my husband wont touch it. I also remember rabbit stew and rabbit with sage and onion stuffing, lovely food, chicken was just for Christmas as it was too expensive to buy any other time, the chicken was always fresh killed when you went to collect it but i didnt know that at the time i went to collect one for my dad, i ran all the way home as i thought the chicken was still alive in the zip topped bag until my dad explained it was just the nerves twitching.
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Bomber 4 May 2012 09:59
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Originally Posted by
hi Rog, you mentioning bread at 10d reminds me of the time I entered the RAF a loaf of bread cost 4 and a half pence. When I came out of the RAF my mother asked me to get a loaf from across the road a little shop we always used I put the 4 and a half pence on the counter and old man Street looked at me an said "a loaf of bread is 6d where have you been lately"?
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Vicky 4 May 2012 11:29
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Originally Posted by
Food from the 50s

I was born in 1940 and never remember being hungry. Yes food was rationed but my Mum grew all her own veg and of course like everyone else made all the meals from scratch, there were no ready made meals. We had rabbit pretty often, rabbit pie and rabbit stew which I loved, however I seem to remember a pet rabbit which dissapeared one day!! We also had delicious suet puddings with different fillings,savoury or sweet. Mind you with all this stodgy food I dont remember many fat people. The things I hated at school were mince,pink custard and butterscoth tart which often came with the dreaded pink custard. At home we always had to eat all our meals including the fat on the meat which was considered good for you and which I hated. Rev Roger I still make treacle tart with breadcrumbs but brown ones not white and we have it with custard,cream or ice cream.
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Mike Pass 4 May 2012 11:35
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Originally Posted by
Hhhmmm!!!!

Stop it, stop it!!!! The pink custard at my school was bostin. The chocolate sauce was obviously better..........
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John (Scouse) Hirons 4 May 2012 12:57
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Originally Posted by
I apologise for the revulsion I am about to engender with my next two sentences-----tapioca, AKA frogs spawn. Who can forget the mashed spuds that were full of lumps & tasted of urine.
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..... 4 May 2012 13:10
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Originally Posted by
Our school had all the grub delivered in flat tin trays and most of it was foul, bearing in mind during the late 40s every kid was hungry, but we were not that hungry. The Head dinner lady was Mrs. Laird and between her and the Nuns who stood over us it was like the Gestapo. I think if Germany had won the war these females would have fitted very well into their system. By ducking and diving, some days i was able to go to the local shops, a large Bloomer loaf 2d. and 1d. chips was Heaven. Because my Mother was a widow my Brother and I got school dinners free but A. Dinners were chronic and B. You had to queue up in a separate line with the green dinner tickets which was highly embarrasing in front of the other kids. So whenever we could we would stay clear of the "Dining room" ( used later for some lessons still with the smell of cabbage. Ugh.
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Steve Greenwood 4 May 2012 13:33
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Originally Posted by
Just to move this on a bit (and feeling somewhat nauseous!) but to stay in the same era, I remember joining HMS Victorious in 1958. The food served on board this newly refurbished carrier was second to none!! There was always a choice of at least four menus and, when the Queen Mother came on board to rededicate the ship there was a table laid out in the junior ratings messdeck resplendent with a whole poached salmon as the centrepiece with every kind of meat and fish with accompaniments that made your mouth water. This was a foretaste of two happy gastronomic years on board. As far as I remember I had never been better fed in my life until I got married.
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..... 4 May 2012 13:49
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Originally Posted by
In the mid 50s the food on our Camp was not very good so filled up with Toast at nearly every meal. The exceptions were Friday lunch (after Pay Parade) and when there was night flying the Mess was opened for about 50 Airmen. The grub was plentiful and first class. There was a ritual with the Cooks and the Duty Officers meal, which i wont detail here except to say that it depended on his popularity with the Staff in the Cookhouse. Happy Days.
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Cave Adsum 4 May 2012 23:12
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: Steve Greenwood Just to move this on a bit (and feeling somewhat nauseous!) but to stay in the same era, I remember joining HMS Victorious in 1958. The food served on board this newly refurbished carrier was second to none!! There was always a choice of at least four menus and, when the Queen Mother came on board to rededicate the ship there was a table laid out in the junior ratings messdeck resplendent with a whole poached salmon as the centrepiece with every kind of meat and fish with accompaniments that made your mouth water. This was a foretaste of two happy gastronomic years on board. As far as I remember I had never been better fed in my life until I got married. My old Headmasters son was on Victorious. Lt. Cdr Apps was the spitting image of his Dad who was one of the best teachers I ever met. He also stayed for school dinners.
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Geordie 5 May 2012 08:27
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Originally Posted by
Food from the 50s

I used to have boiley for breakfast, boiley for dinner, minus the milk. We never had lunch, thats what the posh folk used to have. Then for tea, I had boiley, minus the milk and sugar. I had to sing for my supper...... have any of you ever had boiley toasted on an open fire?
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John (Scouse) Hirons 5 May 2012 08:45
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: Owen Hunter I used to have boiley for breakfast, boiley for dinner, minus the milk. We never had lunch, that's what the posh folk used to have. Then for tea,  I had boiley, minus the milk and sugar. I had to sing for my supper...... have any of you ever had boiley toasted on an open fire? Alright Owen, I always thought a Boiley was something you got on your bummie & a doctor lanced it for you.
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Geordie 5 May 2012 08:50
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Originally Posted by
Naar, where I come from Scouse, it's a pitmatic Northumbrian delicacy.   edit: Currants were sometimes included if we had visitors dropping in for a bite to eat. Last edited by Owen Hunter
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Steve Greenwood 5 May 2012 10:02
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Originally Posted by
Two or three things I used to really enjoy were tinned sliced peaches with evaporated milk for Sunday pudding, Conny Onny as a snack when coming home from school and a Naval delicacy called Hammy, Eggy, Cheesey. This is a very simple snack for lunch which consisted of toast with a layer of cheese then a layer of ham topped by a fried egg. Try it!!,
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Roly01 5 May 2012 10:50
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: Steve Greenwood Two or three things I used to really enjoy  were tinned sliced peaches with evaporated milk for Sunday pudding, 'Conny Onny' as a snack when coming home from school and a Naval delicacy called Hammy, Eggy,  Cheesey. This is a very simple snack for lunch which consisted of toast with a layer of cheese then a layer of ham topped by a fried egg. Try it!!, Hammy eggy cheesy is alway a favourite of mine as well.
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Terry Carey 5 May 2012 18:57
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Originally Posted by
Food from the 50s

Seems as if Mike is out on his own here. He likes, for starters, soggy cabbage as well as everything that everyone else hates. Cast iron stomach Mike? Dried eggs and bananas were still around in the fifties as were dried peaches and apples. The eggs, classed as - re-constituted as I recall - were fine by me but the bananas were vile and they are my favourite fruit. The peaches and apple slices had to be soaked in water for ages before serving and were best in pies. I had left school before the fifties but by then my stomach had become accustomed to eating just about anything. Except cheese which I still hate apart from in pizzas where you cant really taste it. Corned beef and Spam were tasty, if unhealthy, additions to the menu but I used to be asked to go to a local butchers for a jar of potted meat on some occasions. Truly awful but my Mother used to enjoy it. Owen - what the hell is a boiley? TC.
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John (Scouse) Hirons 5 May 2012 19:16
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: Steve Greenwood Two or three things I used to really enjoy  were tinned sliced peaches with evaporated milk for Sunday pudding, 'Conny Onny' as a snack when coming home from school and a Naval delicacy called Hammy, Eggy,  Cheesey. This is a very simple snack for lunch which consisted of toast with a layer of cheese then a layer of ham topped by a fried egg. Try it!!, Alright Steve, Talking of compo (which we werent) I used to love the corned dog (corned beef to the uninitiated) I never got to taste the sweeties as my kids loved them & just to prove my Mrs has no taste she used to nick my Compo cheese & actually loved hard tack. You could always tell were we had played silly soldiers there was mounds of liver & bacon lobbed as far as we could chuck them, Ill swear they were designed by the SS for the British armed forces.
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Geordie 5 May 2012 19:40
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: Terry Carey Owen - what the hell is a bailey? TC. Boiled milk and bread, Terry...... I had the diluted version though, half milk half boiled water and a sprinkle of sugar.
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Geordie 5 May 2012 19:43
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Originally Posted by
Boiley, not bailey.   edit: How does boiley change to bailey when quoted?...... weird. Last edited by Owen Hunter
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Ally Bell 5 May 2012 19:44
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Originally Posted by
over here in the north we call it panado.. was reared on it.....
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Steve Greenwood 6 May 2012 10:36
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Originally Posted by
The missus thinks I've got really bad taste as far as food goes.  I used to love Faggots and peas and' (you're ot going to believe this!!) Naafi pork pies!! I still dont know what went into Faggots so please dont tell me! Last edited by Steve Greenwood
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Mike Pass 6 May 2012 19:27
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Originally Posted by
Hhhmmm!!!!

Faggots are made from offal of course but then again most offal is edible, apart from the lights. Liver, kidney, heart etc; we eat those without much fuss. the content of faggots is no different. Heres an analogy.....Muesli (the very clever Swiss innovation) was quite literally the sweepings up from the floor of the cereals processing plant, originally! This was nothing more than a business incentive. The pretentious yuppies of the time decided that it fell within their remit and away you go! It may not be swept from the plant floor these days but it is not produced via dedicated process and never will be. Money for old rope......or old oats perhaps! Faggots n paes is obviously a Black Country staple.
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Who Does Guard The Guardians?? 6 May 2012 20:52
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Originally Posted by
Quoting Mike Pass, Faggots 'n paes is obviously a Black Country staple. ........................... Nah yo spakin abart proper fittle, speshully wum med uns.
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Who Does Guard The Guardians?? 6 May 2012 20:58
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Originally Posted by
One treat I recall from my time in the forces, compo cheese on hard-tack bikkies, with a good smear of compo jam, lovely whilst on radio duty at night.
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Little Mo 7 May 2012 15:10
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: Steve Greenwood The missus thinks I've got really bad taste as far as food goes.  I used to love Faggots and peas and' (you're ot going to believe this!!) Naafi pork pies!!  I still don't know what went into Faggots so please don't tell me! Last edited by Steve Greenwood Steve, theres nothing nasty in faggots, the main ingredient is liver. I still make them at home and my husband and i love them.
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Terry Carey 7 May 2012 17:47
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: Owen Hunter Boiley, not bailey.   edit: How does boiley change to bailey when quoted?...... weird.   Last edited by Owen Hunter I'd just washed my hands Owen and couldn't do a thing with them. Bread and milk when served to infants round here used to be called Pobs or Pobbies for some reason quite unfathomable. TC. Last edited by Terry Carey
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Syd Jones 7 May 2012 18:02
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: Don Knight One treat I recall from my time in the forces, compo cheese on hard-tack bikkies, with a good smear of compo jam, lovely whilst on radio duty at night. Well Don. Cant really think of many treats from forces days, except Kitkats Although the guy in the naafi would do me Egg-in-a-nest once Id gone into the kitchen and shown him what it was (he didnt speak much English). The thing I do remember was that my mate Tony Belcher and I used to swap a bottle of Maltese beer, dreadful stuff, for the rum rations everyone was issued with whenever we went swanning off in the blue, few lads in the troop being old enough to prefer rum to beer! This accumulated quicker than we could drink it and still stay fairly sober! It did mean though, that we usually had a full water bottle or two, handy for dark and cold nights...No matter what we were supposed to be doing! Cheers, Syd.
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Marie Drew 24 May 2012 20:07
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Originally Posted by
Yesterday, I was invited to have a school lunch with my six year old granddaughter. Semolina, sago and frogspawn were not in sight. Healthy eating was the order of the day. A choice of broccoli cheese bake or roast pork and apple sauce with vegetables followed by fresh fruit or chocolate pudding was on offer. Times have certainly changed from my school days ...............for the better. The seating arrangements were on the small side. The Dads who attended must have found the low small stools suitable for little ones most uncomfortable for their posteriors. but there you are.
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..... 24 May 2012 21:26
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Originally Posted by
in 57 when i was demobbed i took a job as a carpet saleman in the Jewish quarter of Leeds which introduced me to the delights of Kosher baking. Delicatessens with mouth watering Onion Cakes and fresh bagels with cheese. also a Jewish bakery that would sell you their products at any time through the night. Many times after a late night out, the following morning i have come down to the Kitchen to find i have purchased enough Bread ect. to feed an Army. These days there are shops selling Bagels but non like old Hymie Bloombergs down North St. in those days, or so it seems.
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