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Cheshire Regiment WW1

{{forumThread.upVotes}} Created by Dorothy Christopher 12 March 2012 19:31 7054 views Link  
Dorothy Christopher 12 March 2012 19:31
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Originally Posted by
Cheshire Regiment WW1

My grandfather Private Thomas Christopher 6540 2nd Btn. Cheshire Regiment has no known grave. Whereabouts in France would he have been at the time of his death which was the 8th May 1915. Any information regarding my ever so brave and courageous grandad would be gratefully welcomed.
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Old Sweat (Puddle Jumper) 12 March 2012 22:19
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: Dorothy Christopher My grandfather Private Thomas Christopher 6540 2nd Btn. Cheshire Regiment has no known grave. Whereabouts in France would he have been at the time of his death which was the 8th May 1915. Any information regarding my ever so brave and courageous grandad would be gratefully welcomed. Dorothy.I suggest you try the Castle Chester and the Regimental Archivist. I am taking a party from the Cheshire Regimtenal Association (Stockport) to Belgium and the Battlefields in July. We cover St Juliaan,Tyne Cot,Passendale and Ypres amonst others.Should you be succesful and find where his name will be then let me know and I will lay a Poppy beneath his name for you.(If we are in the right location)
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Old Sweat (Puddle Jumper) 12 March 2012 22:23
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Originally Posted by
Dorothy

2nd Battalion Cheshire Regiment under attack at Frezenberg - 2nd Battle of Ypres Seems his name will be on the Menin Gate Ypres.Would you like me to take a look when we go there for the Last Post Ceremony? Last edited by Gordon H Smith
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Fr Admin 13 March 2012 10:38
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Originally Posted by
The Battle of Frezenberg: 8-13 May 1915   The scene of the battles was the Ypres salient on the Western Front, where the Allied line which followed the canal bulged eastward around the town of Ypres, Belgium. Fighting was so heavy on the Frezenberg Ridge when they came out of the Line the survivors of 1st Bn Northumberland Fusiliers, 1st Bn Welch Regt, 2nd Bn Cheshire Regt and 1st Bn Suffolk Regt were formed into a Composite Battalion with a Capt from 1 Suffolk as CO. Commemorated on Panel 19 - 22. YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL. Son of Edward and Alice Christopher, of The Kennels, Wervin, Chester; husband of Mary Jane Johnston (formerly Christopher), of 67, Elmswood Rd., Higher Tranmere, Birkenhead. Last edited by Phil Beacall
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Dorothy Christopher 13 March 2012 11:01
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Originally Posted by
The Menin Gate

Thank you Gordon for the information you have provided for me. I would really appreciate your offer of placing a poppy for my Grandfather Thomas at the Menin Gate. My late Father was affected the whole of his life by the loss of his Dad..... so for Thomas Christopher my Grandfather... to have his own poppy placed even with no grave means soooooo very much to me.
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Dorothy Christopher 13 March 2012 11:23
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Originally Posted by
Cheshire Regiment

Wow Phil so much information I am totally overwhelmed thank you. His parents address has provided valuable information Thomas had brothers some of which were also in the Cheshire Regiment. To have the actual name of the battle is just superb. So if it started on the 8th May that was the day he was killed. Where would he of been before that would he of been in England ? Not sure the date when WW1 actually started.
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Dorothy Christopher 13 March 2012 11:33
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Originally Posted by
Cheshire Regiment uniform

I have a photo of Thomas and he is dressed in a Tunic my late Father said it was Red and that he was in India at some stage or was it Africa. I really do not know. Was this before WW1 maybe he joined up before then ?
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Old Sweat (Puddle Jumper) 13 March 2012 14:51
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: Dorothy Christopher I have a photo of Thomas and he is dressed in a Tunic my late Father said it was Red and that he was in India at some stage or was it Africa. I really do not know. Was this before WW1 maybe he joined up before then ? A Cheshire Regiment was serving in India prior to WW1 (Not certain which one though) Glad to be of little assistance,rest assured the Poppy Cross will be laid beneath his name,thanks to Phil for the Panel Numbers.
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Fr Admin 13 March 2012 15:03
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Originally Posted by
I am sorry, but We do not have the information on when he enlisted. The Cheshire Regiment consisted of the following Battalions: The Cheshire Regiment Battalions of the Regular Army 1st Battalion 2nd Battalion: (1881 Cheshire Regiment 22nd and 2/22nd White Lapels on Red Tunic (buff Lapels from 1904). August 1914 : in Jubbulpore, India. Returned to England, landing at Devonport on 24 December 1914. Attached to 84th Brigade, 28th Division, at Winchester. Landed at Le Havre 17 January 1915. Moved in October 1915 to Egypt and then on to Salonika. 12 January 1916 : the 1st Manx (Service) Company joined and became A Company. 3rd (Reserve) Battalion Battalions of the Territorial Force 1/4th Battalion 1/5th (Earl of Chesters) Battalion 1/6th Battalion 1/7th Battalion 2/4th Battalion 2/5th (Earl of Chesters) Battalion 2/6th Battalion 2/7th Battalion 3/4th, 3/5th, 3/6th and 3/7th Battalions 23rd Battalion Battalions of the New Armies 8th (Service) Battalion 9th (Service) Battalion 10th (Service) Battalion 11th (Service) Battalion 12th (Service) Battalion 13th (Service) Battalion 14th (Reserve) Battalion 15th (Service) Battalion (1st Birkenhead) 16th (Service) Battalion (2nd Birkenhead) 17th (Reserve) Battalion Other Battalions 18th and 19th (Labour) Battalions 20th (Labour) Battalion 21st (Labour) Battalion 22nd (Labour) Battalion 24th (Home Service) Battalion 1st Garrison Battalion 2nd Garrison Battalion 3rd (Home Service) Garrison Battalion 51st (Graduated) Battalion 52nd (Graduated) Battalion 53rd (Young Soldier) Battalion South Africa. In 1900, the 2nd Battalion fought in South Africa, and was present at the engagements of Jacobsdal, Karree Siding, Brandfort, Vet, River, Sand River and the Capture of Johannesburg.
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Dorothy Christopher 13 March 2012 16:14
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Originally Posted by
Menin Gate

My sincere thanks Gordon that Thomas will have his own poppy cross. I am so grateful to you.
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Dorothy Christopher 13 March 2012 16:34
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Originally Posted by
Cheshire Regiment Uniform

Again I am totally overwhelmed Phil thank you it makes fascinating reading. Very informative. The uniform must therefore be after 1904. It has the emblem of two acorns on either side of the collar around his neck. On one sleeve of the tunic it has a large X emblem next to stripes that point towards it .... no idea what that means ? Under his arm he has a very thin cane or a baton maybe ?
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Dorothy Christopher 13 March 2012 17:01
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Originally Posted by
Cheshire Regiment in India

Phil your reference to India has just confirmed something that I was not aware of as it is not often mentioned. Thomas was most definitely therefore in Jubbulpore,India. Your information further clarifies that fact for me because I have an item that belonged to Thomas which has had Indian origin. He brought it back home before being sent to France.
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Fr Admin 12 June 2012 16:53
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: Dorothy Christopher Phil your reference to India has just confirmed something that I was not aware of as it is not often mentioned.   Thomas was most definitely therefore in Jubbulpore,India. Your information further clarifies that fact for me because I have an item that belonged to Thomas which has had Indian origin. He brought it back home before being sent to France. The Acorn is something you will find on most things Cheshire Regiment, It is part of their Cap Badge. I am sure Gordon will be able to tell us why his Regiment has the Acorn. Glad the info I provided has assisted you. Can you upload the picture of the X by his stripes? It has me puzzled.
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Old Sweat (Puddle Jumper) 28 July 2012 17:15
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Originally Posted by
The Acorn

There is a tradition of a detachment of the Cheshire Regiment engaged in the Battle of Dettingen when the King George 2nd (I think) who was the last reigning Monarch to command troops in Battle,he was surrounded by the French and was in danger of capture until the Cheshires came to his rescue.In token of his gratitude the story goes he then plucked an oak leaf from the tree he was taking refuge near and presented it to the detachment with the instruction This Regiment will wear the Oak Leaf in its headdress when ever in the presence of Royalty The Acorn in Slip (Oak leaf garland around the Acorn) was adopted as the Cap Badge of the Cheshire Regiment./This tradition is still carried out today even though the Cheshire Regiment is now part of the Mercian Regiment. We Old Sweats will carry on this tradition until the last one of us falls off the perch.
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Old Sweat (Puddle Jumper) 28 July 2012 17:17
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Originally Posted by
X Emblem

Phil I suspect the emblem could well be the Crossed Rifles of a Marksman.
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Sigs 28 July 2012 18:02
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Originally Posted by
cheshire regiment WW1

Hi Gordon that is my feeling too my grandad was in WW`1 with the cheshires he had crossed rifles on his arm (405 pte a ball ).
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Fr Admin 30 July 2012 08:45
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: Gordon H Smith Phil I suspect the 'emblem' could well be the Crossed Rifles of a Marksman. Gordon, thank you for the insight into the history of the Acorn and Oak leaf for the Cheshire Regiment. Ditto Gordon, my first thought was marksman. Still is as cannot think of anything "cross" on uniform sleeve.
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Sigs 30 July 2012 19:47
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Originally Posted by
cheshire regiment WWW1

Hi Phil . I had crossed flags on my sleaves in colour on BD in gold on Blues and a gold star over my tapes I was a signals NCO .
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Who Does Guard The Guardians?? 30 July 2012 20:18
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Originally Posted by
Crossed rifles on the sleeve in the fifties was recognition of a marksman, crossed semaphore flags on the left lower arm of Artillery personell signified signaller.
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