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HMS Liverpool Final Farewell to her Home City

{{forumThread.upVotes}} Created by Fr Admin 1 March 2012 15:52 996 views Link  
Fr Admin 1 March 2012 15:52
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Originally Posted by
HMS Liverpool Final Farewell to her Home City

HMS Liverpool has returned to her home city to take a farewell bow in her spiritual home after three decades of service. The Type 42 destroyer sailed into the Mersey today (Wednesday) at the start of a six-day visit. She was laid down at Cammell Laird's in 1978 and launched from the famous Birkenhead yard in 1980 before entering service in 1982 - two weeks after the Falklands Conflict ended. The ship has sailed the world for the Royal Navy in peace time and conflict ever since. Most recently, off Libya, she became the first Royal Navy ship to be fired upon for 30 years during her seven month deployment to the area. Described as a "thoroughly proud Merseyside lass" by the Navy, she will open her gangway for the final time to the UK public as she comes to the natural end of her working life in the navy later this year. HMS Liverpool is due to berth alongside at the Cruise Liner Terminal this morning, marking the beginning of a busy, celebratory programme. As well as holding a reception for invited guests during her stay, the ship's company is also looking forward to hosting some 20 groups, schools, colleges and organisations on board. Tomorrow will see the crew take to the streets of Liverpool to exercise their Freedom of the City for the last time. HMS Liverpool was awarded this honour in 1982 and has exercised this ancient tradition on numerous occasions during her close affiliation with this great maritime city. HMS Liverpool will make her last journey down the Mersey on the morning of 5th March, leaving the Cruise Liner Terminal at 11am and delivering a gun salute at Cammell Laird's shortly afterwards; she will then sail past the Royal Liver Building to deliver a second gun salute to the city with which she has been so proudly intertwined over the past 30 years. Commanding Officer of HMS Liverpool, Commander Colin Williams, said: "This visit is one of celebration and appreciation of the sterling service which this exceptional ship has offered her country during her three decades at sea. "To be bringing her back home to Liverpool is, without question, not only the absolute pinnacle of this celebration, but also a very poignant and dignified moment in her long and illustrious life. "We have always enjoyed absolutely exceptional links with Liverpool. I know that my crew is honoured and excited to show off their ship once more to Merseysiders, who have always shown unparalleled hospitality and enthusiasm for this great ship. "I am extremely proud to have commanded HMS Liverpool and her crew - there is obviously some sadness in bidding farewell to any ship, but, more than anything, this is a time to honour HMS Liverpool and her achievements, the most recent of which was outstanding and key support to the NATO operations off the coast of Libya. "I sincerely hope that as many Merseysiders as possible will make the journey to the Cruise Liner Terminal to visit the ship on Saturday and Sunday when we open to the public. It allows us in our own small way to return the hospitality and affection shown over more than three decades before bidding our final fond farewell." HMS Liverpool sailed at the end of March 2011 to support Operation Unified Protector where her tasks included enforcing the No-Fly Zone and conducting embargo operations to prevent arms from reaching pro-Gaddafi forces by sea. During this high-tempo mission to protect the Libyan citizens, HMS Liverpool's ship's company spent 81 hours at Action Stations on 28 separate occasions, were fired at and returned fire ten times, and launched 211 rounds of illumination and high explosive shells from her 4.5 inch gun. These illumination or star shells were fired to light up pro-Gaddafi positions for NATO aircraft to identify and destroy. The ship's company witnessed the siege of Misratah and the fall of Tripoli, Zlitan, Al Khums and Sirte to the rebels and, while enforcing the No-Fly Zone, Liverpool's Fighter Controllers spent 360 hours controlling 14 different types of aircraft from a number of NATO countries. Last edited by Phil Beacall
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Slim 10 March 2012 09:16
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Originally Posted by
Ex- LREM

Makes me feel ancient because I left the Navy before she was even built ! Now theyre paying her off. My last ship was a Daring Class destroyer .. Defender. No missiles in those days !
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Steve Greenwood 10 March 2012 09:38
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Originally Posted by
Know how you feel, Michael but, werent they beautiful ships!!!
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Ceylon220 10 March 2012 09:38
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Originally Posted by
Michael,you were serving as I was in ships that looked like warships(Greyhounds of the sea),cannot get used to these ones today that don`t look the part, all the same its a shame to see them on their last deployment before decommissioning and an unknown future--sold/scrapped, there are more of our ships in this position but not enough being replaced---God only knows if ever we are at war again and having to defend our shores,our navy,airforce and army has been reduced to a dangerous state and the government body are ignoring the consequences ,only people like us who have served can see it yet these part time MPs are blind to it. At one time,even in my time 53/73 we had ships covering every seaport in the world now most are in the middle east area,if the Falklands/Argentina troubles start where do we get the ships and manpower from as we had to rely on the Merchant fleet for support the last time out. By the way Phil, thanks for posting a good write up on the LIVERPOOL,she has served the country well since the day she hit the water for the first time,there will be many a tear from the crew when they leave for the last time. Last edited by Dave Whitfield
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Steve Greenwood 10 March 2012 10:53
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Originally Posted by
Heres a thought,lads! If and when the new carriers are built and commissioned, where are they going to get the personnel to crew them??
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Brigham 10 March 2012 11:22
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Originally Posted by
Daring Class

I was on the Diana in the Far East. Beautiful ship with a great turn of speed. Capt. was James Starten known as hardover starten cause that was the only helm command he knew.
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John (Scouse) Hirons 10 March 2012 15:01
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Originally Posted by
We not only lose a fine ship we lose a tradition. There has been a HMS Liverpool in Royal Navy service since 1741 but when the current one goes there are no plans for a new one, a sad loss both to the city & the service.
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