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Times Past

{{forumThread.upVotes}} Created by Marie Drew 22 February 2012 15:49 13003 views Link  
Marie Drew 22 February 2012 15:49
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Originally Posted by
Times Past

Last Monday morning I took my eight year old granddaughter to school. Apparently, the current topic is WW11 and the children had been asked to attend school dressed 1940s clothes. As I had been in school in the late 1940s my help for suggestions was asked. A skirt, now on the shortside was found to which were attached two shoulder straps crossed over at the back, and a blouse with puff sleeves and round collar. My granddaughter arrived downstairs in these but also in white tights. I said "tights had not been invented in the 1940s. Come summer or winter I went to school in ankle socks. She looked at me in horror and relpied "but my legs will be ever so cold," I said "Children were a hardy lot then" Her hair was tied in two bunches with ribbons and she looked the part. On arrival at shool, the boys were dressed in short trousers rather than their long ones, v-necked pullovers and sporting a variety of peak caps. One boy was very inventive and carried a gas mask holder over his shoulder made out of a cardboard box and string. On Thusday the children have been asked to take a 1940s packed lunch to school. So my granddaughter asked what could she have in her lunch box. Well I said. "You will not be able to have your usual ham sandwiches as ham was very scarce like most foods and was only eaten on very special occasions. Neither will you be able to have your usual crisps, yogurt, banana or grapes or fruit drink. People could not just buy exactly what they wanted from the shops as all food and clothing were rationed" "What is rationed" she asked "It means that people were only allowed to have a set amount of anything every month". "Well what can I have" she enquired with a grim look on her face. "Spam sandwiches (which I believe is still available in supermarkets these days) and an apple". I told her. "SPAM what is spam.........................?? Do I say more. Somehow I do not think my granddaughter is looking forward to this lunch. However, not withstanding the enjoyment the children will have from, in some small way, re-living these times, hopefully they will also understand many hardships that generations in the past endured I should imagine that there are many on FR who have memories of these times.
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..... 22 February 2012 16:18
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Originally Posted by
Marie. During the War my sister used to get a small Food parcel sent from the family of her Pen Pal in the U.S. I remember the Powdered dried eggs which at the time we thought was wonderful. I think as a Kid at that time being always hungry was the biggest thing. Though my mother used to bake there never seemed to be enough to go round. Even my Missus, who was born in 1947 finds it hard to visualise what Food and clothing Rationing was actually like. When i was on school holidays we used to go to Town and join any queue we saw and then ask what it was. One time it was Hardware on sale and we got a bucket, that was really something at that time Another time some cups and saucers. Streets with never a scrap of litter about were the norm. as there was so little paper, tins or such like to throw away. T.T. F. N.
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John Richards 22 February 2012 16:38
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Originally Posted by
Times Past

Ah, Marie, Spam - yum yum. I seem to remember sandwiches filled with every kind of delicious treats, cucumber, beetroot, tomato and onion. The great joy was swapping with the other children and discovering such glorious treats as brown sauce butties, chip butties, and the greatest culinary experience of all, bread and dripping. We were a fit generation because our tums were full, and we had to do a lot of walking because our parents didnt own cars. Even the Police rode bikes!
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Mike Pass 22 February 2012 17:38
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Originally Posted by
Hhhmmm!!!!

I have just had Spam fritters for tea, as it goes. Why waste it on Carp??!!!!
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Mo 22 February 2012 17:58
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Originally Posted by
AROMA

Quoting: Mike Pass I have just had Spam fritters for tea, as it goes. Why waste it on Carp??!!!! as i am sat here with modern technology at my finger tips ther drifts in to my nostrils the aroma of Pigs Liver and Onions (being cooked by the second best Cook in the World my dear old Mum was the best) it will be served with Creamed Potatoes, Savoy Cabbage Carrots and Parsnips with a plenty full amount of Gravey poured on top, All of this to be followed with Steamed Apple Pudding and Custard, Am i making any one hungry! because i am , So i,m just off to have it .
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John Richards 22 February 2012 18:39
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Originally Posted by
Times Past

Trying to stir up nostalgia for wartime food, does anyone know where I can buy tinned snoek?
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Pamela Forbes 22 February 2012 19:08
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: John Richards Trying to stir up nostalgia for wartime food, does anyone know where I can buy tinned snoek? I dont know about tinned or canned, John, but Cruga in Milton Keynes had frozen snoek available in 2007. Would this one be big enough for you?
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..... 22 February 2012 19:31
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: John Richards Ah, Marie, Spam - yum yum. I seem to remember sandwiches filled with every kind of delicious treats, cucumber, beetroot, tomato and onion. The great joy was swapping with the other children and discovering such glorious treats as brown sauce butties, chip butties, and the greatest culinary experience of all, bread and dripping. We were a fit generation because our tums were full, and we had to do a lot of walking because our parents didn't own cars. Even the Police rode bikes! On my way to school during the War if i stayed on the tram a few stop more than i should there was a little shop called Mrs, Dolans, or to us kids as the Fat and Bread Shop. Here a slice of Bread with thick dripping and salt was 1d. or if you asked and waited you might get 2 crusts for a 1d. This waiting would make me late for school (caned if late more than once in a week) but the second crust would sell at playtime for a 1d. Samething i used to stay on tram, go into the Market, Bag of crab claws for a penny. Late for school, got caned,At playtime sold 3 claws at 1d. each, already eaten the 4th. one. All worth while when lunchtime came i passed on the awful school dinners, went up to the Fishshop, 1d. bag chips and a large Bloomer 3d loaf from the Bakers next door. I had swollen hands but i was in Heaven.
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Nobby 22 February 2012 19:47
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Originally Posted by
I noted this today in the Daily Mail online, and just about every word describes my growing up in the 40s and 50s! "Congratulations to all my friends who were born in the 1940s, 50s and 60s. First, we survived being born to mothers who smoked and/or drank sherry while they carried us and lived in houses made of asbestos. They took aspirin, ate blue cheese, bread and dripping, raw egg products, loads of bacon and processed meat, and didn't get tested for diabetes or cervical cancer. Then, after that trauma, our baby cots were covered with bright coloured lead-based paints. We had no childproof lids on medicine bottles, or locks on doors or cabinets and when we rode our bikes, we had no helmets or shoes, not to mention the risks we took hitchhiking. As children, we would ride in cars with no seatbelts or air bags. We drank water from the garden hose, not from a bottle. Takeaway food was limited to fish and chips, there were no pizza shops, McDonald's, KFC, Subway or Nando's. Even though all the shops closed at 6pm and didn't open on a Sunday, somehow we didn't starve to death! We shared one soft drink with four friends from one bottle and no one died from this. We could collect old drink bottles and cash them in at the corner store and buy toffees, gobstoppers and bubble gum. We ate white bread and real butter, drank cow's milk and soft drinks with sugar, but we weren't overweight because?.?.?. we were always outside playing! We would leave home in the morning and play all day, as long as we were back when the streetlights came on. No one was able to reach us all day, but we were OK. We would spend hours building go-karts out of old prams and then ride down the hill, only to find out we forgot the brakes. We built treehouses and dens and played in riverbeds with Matchbox cars. We did not have PlayStations, Nintendo Wii and Xboxes, or video games, DVDs, or colour TV. There were no mobiles, computers, internet or chatrooms. We had friends and we went outside and found them! We fell out of trees, got cut, broke bones and teeth and there were no lawsuits from these accidents. And we ate worms and mud pies made from dirt, too. Only girls had pierced ears. You could buy Easter eggs and hot cross buns only at Easter time. We were given air guns and catapults for our tenth birthdays, we rode bikes or walked to a friend's house and knocked on the door or just yelled for them. Not everyone made the school rugby, football, cricket or netball teams. Those who didn't had to learn to deal with disappointment. Imagine that. Getting into the team was based on merit. Our teachers hit us with canes, gym shoes and threw the blackboard rubber at us if they thought we weren't concentrating. We can string sentences together, spell and have proper conversations now because of a solid three Rs education. Our parents would tell us to ask a stranger to help us cross the road. Mum didn't have to go to work to help Dad make ends meet because we didn't need to keep up with the Joneses! The idea of a parent bailing us out if we broke the law was unheard of. They actually sided with the law! Parents didn't invent stupid names for their kids like Kiora, Blade, Ridge and Vanilla. We had freedom, failure, success and responsibility, and we learned how to deal with it all. You might want to share this with others who grew up in an era before the lawyers and the government regulated our lives. And while you are at it, forward it to your children, so they will know how brave their parents were".
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Mo 22 February 2012 20:10
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Originally Posted by
wipers

[QUOTE]Quoting: john daly[/B] [I]Marie. During the War my sister used to get a small Food parcel  sent from the family of her Pen Pal in the U.S. I remember the Powdered dried eggs which at the time we thought was wonderful. I think as a Kid at that time being always hungry was the biggest thing. Though my mother used to bake  there never seemed to be enough to go round. Even my Missus, who was born in 1947 finds it hard to visualise what Food and clothing Rationing  was actually like. When i was on school holidays we used to go to Town and join any queue we saw and then ask what it was. One time it was Hardware on sale and we got a bucket, that was really something at that time Another time some cups and saucers. Streets with never a scrap of litter about were the norm. as there was so little paper, tins or such like to throw away.   T.T. F. N. [/I][/QUOTE]can you remember the that we used to cut up news papers in squares to hang on a nail in the out side toilet it was bloody hard luck if you had to get down to using a Blue Sugar bag !:crazy: :sick:
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Marie Drew 22 February 2012 21:04
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: John Richards Ah, Marie, Spam - yum yum. I seem to remember sandwiches filled with every kind of delicious treats, cucumber, beetroot, tomato and onion. The great joy was swapping with the other children and discovering such glorious treats as brown sauce butties, chip butties, and the greatest culinary experience of all, bread and dripping. We were a fit generation because our tums were full, and we had to do a lot of walking because our parents didn't own cars. Even the Police rode bikes! I suggested spam as a suitable sandwich filler for a WW11 packed lunch as spam was introduced from USA to the UK just prior to the war and widely use in a variety of ways (often becoming monotonous) as a substitute for meat just as margarine was substituted for butter as all dairy products were rationed too. As a child, I like other children of that time, did not have choices but had to eat the food which was put in front of me. For several years after the war, my mother reared chickens for their eggs. One always disappeared just before Christmas...........I wonder why? John. we really were a fitter generation than todays children who think it is normal to be dropped off by car at school every day. I thought nothing of walking a mile to school and a mile back again twice a day (home for lunch), and much time was spent outside playing games instead of being glued to the television or a computer.
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Old Sweat (Puddle Jumper) 22 February 2012 21:20
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Originally Posted by
Ahhh Spam Fritters with Brown Sauce and fried in BEEF Dripping.
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Roly01 22 February 2012 21:28
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: Gordon H Smith Ahhh Spam Fritters with Brown Sauce and fried in BEEF Dripping. Now your talking My mouth is watering and my belly is hollow!
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Pamela Forbes 22 February 2012 21:44
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: Arthur(Roly) Rowsell Now your talking My mouth is watering and my belly is hollow! So............ You wont be wanting my cheese dreams then??!!
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Old Sweat (Puddle Jumper) 22 February 2012 21:44
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Originally Posted by
I can hear it from here Rowley.
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..... 22 February 2012 22:14
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Originally Posted by
You have started something here Marie. During the war and just after the weedy kids were given a very large spoon and a large jar of Malt, allowed to take it to the cloakroom to have it. strangely enough they never liked it so we, who loved this thick sticky sweet glue, loved it, made an excuse to get out of the classroom and made a bee line for the cloakroom. Funny thing that if we get the "Stick" (a thick wooden rod) more than 3 times we were sent to the cloakroom to soak our hands in hot water. I wonder now whether it was so we didnt go home with swollen hands and our parents saw them. If we were lucky we were in there soaking our hands when the "Sickie" boys came in with the precious malt. The one and only time Leeds was bombed our school had its windows blown out and we were off for about a week. Good old Adolf.....
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Sparky 22 February 2012 22:49
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Originally Posted by
I am in dispute with some friends in the 60s i remember being served with triangular sausages they cam in tins but i can not remember what camp i was on when i had them i think they were getting rid of old emergency rations does anyone else remember them
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Cave Adsum 22 February 2012 23:25
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: brian amos I am in dispute with some friends in the 60s i remember being served with triangular sausages they cam in tins but i can not remember what camp i was on when i had them i think they were getting rid of old emergency rations does anyone else remember them     These triangular and skinless sausages came in a tin, smothered in lard - very healthy, and were standard in the Compo Rations as was my favourite, Mutton and peas in gravy. Last time I had any was in Libya, circa 1963, Exercise Triplex West.
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Old Sweat (Puddle Jumper) 22 February 2012 23:52
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Originally Posted by
We had those in our 24 hour Ration Packs in Malaya.
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Murray Whyte 23 February 2012 00:00
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: Marie Drew we really were a fitter generation than today's children who think it is normal to be dropped off by car at school every day.  I thought nothing of walking a mile to school and a mile back again twice a day (home for lunch), and much time was spent outside playing games instead of being glued to the television or a computer. Come rain or snow my three kids walk to school. I offer them a lift each and every morning which they refuse. It is helped by the schools as they have regular walk to school weeks. My kids school is two miles away.
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Roly01 23 February 2012 06:29
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Originally Posted by
You should join them Murray. Get you fit? When do I get banned?
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Marie Drew 23 February 2012 09:15
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Originally Posted by
[QUOTE]Quoting: john daly [I]You have started something  here Marie. During the war and just after the weedy kids were given a very large spoon and a large jar of Malt, allowed to take it to the cloakroom to have it. strangely enough they never liked it so we, who loved this thick sticky sweet glue, loved it, made an excuse to get out of the classroom and made a bee line for the cloakroom. ---------------------- As children we were given a weekly dose (one large tablespoonful) of Scots Emulsion. to supplement our diet. It must have comprised needy nutrients as weare advised to include oily fish in our diets these days. Oh but the taste was foul.............
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Raymond Hall 23 February 2012 09:31
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Originally Posted by
cyber family 174 weedy kids

dear john,I too had my regular ration of MALT also cod liver oil,loved the malt,hated the cod liver oil, we also had visits from NITTY NORA I recon that the whole school had to have them horrible baths about twice in one year!
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John Richards 23 February 2012 11:47
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Originally Posted by
Times Past

Cod Liver Oil and Malt was supplied free by the Government to keep us little kiddiwinkies fit. I loved it but my sister hated it because it got stuck in her moustache. Another exciting event was gas-mask drill where we had to put them on while the teacher checked them. With a little practice we boys could make great farting noises by loosening the edge and breathing heavily. The baby next door had his own respirator that was secured around his waist and made him look like Humpty Dumpty.
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Raymond Hall 23 February 2012 12:20
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Originally Posted by
cyber family 174 times past

.who can remember [or forget] powderd eggs? powdered potatoes? corned beef sold ouy of 7lb tins?my mother used to make corned beef stew 3 times a week with suet dumplings, I loved it ,and make it once efery couple of weeks,wife recons ime round the bend ,but I dont care ,still love it as long as IT is made with fray bentos corned beef,nothing else tastes the same
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..... 23 February 2012 12:31
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: John Richards Cod Liver Oil and Malt was supplied free by the Government to keep us little kiddiwinkies fit. I loved it but my sister hated it because it got stuck in her moustache. Another exciting event was gas-mask drill where we had to put them on while the teacher checked them. With a little practice we boys could make great 'farting' noises by loosening the edge and breathing heavily. The baby next door had his own respirator that was secured around his waist and made him look like Humpty Dumpty. I loved School sing song on Thurs. afternoon in the science room where the whole school gathered and we, who sat at the back on the tables could turn on the gas taps, which eventually put most of the Junior children ( sat on the floor) to Sleep.
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Raymond Hall 23 February 2012 12:52
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Originally Posted by
yber family 174 times pastc

almost forgot, we had to bring our own lunch to school which we ate with our free 1/2 pint of milk,I always had bread and jam sardies; or if I was lucky some chocolate spread had to make our own, mum and dad went to work at 0630,if you didnt bring any lunch for 3 days they would report it to child care and someone would come and ask embarrasing questions if they wernt happy with the answers you got free school dinners but none of the other school kids new,saved your parents embarrassment,always got spotted dick, or semolina [frogs spawn for desert[yuk]good old days never forget them or how many times I got the cane,[sadistic buggers some of them teachers!
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..... 23 February 2012 12:56
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: raymond hall dear john,I too had my regular ration of MALT also cod liver  oil,loved the malt,hated the cod liver oil, we also  had visits from NITTY NORA I recon that the whole school  had to have them horrible baths about twice in one year! Ray. We also had a Nit Nurse who arrived each year. She was a fat ugly women who used to sqat on a chair whilst we filed up to her. She would examine your head for lice then pull your short trousers at the front, have a look down and then blow once. I never did find out what that ceremony was for. I think i have mentioned this ritual before on F.Reu. but those things do tend to stick in your mind.
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Terry Carey 23 February 2012 14:39
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Originally Posted by
Times past

Quoting: john daly .. She would examine your head for lice then pull your short  trousers at the front, have a look down and then blow once. I never did find out what that ceremony was for. I think i have mentioned this ritual before on F.Reu. but those things do tend to stick in your mind. What!!!! B.Js at that age!!!! Lucky sod!!!! TC.
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Nobby 23 February 2012 15:59
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Originally Posted by
You see lots of advertising today on the benefits of Omega 3 from fish oil sold in capsule form, and in those health shops. I know lots of people who take them religiously in the belief that it is the new wonder of the world. We were way ahead of them, because we were given our daily dose of cod liver oil whether we wanted it or not , and Ive never met anyone who did! I have read somewhere that, nationally, the general health of people under rationing was better than it is today, because there was nothing available that was bad for you! Except that bloody cod liver oil... As for walking to school, all of our three kids did so, and so do our grand-kids today. I did it, summer and winter, through sleet and snow and dark, and we never gave a thought to it.
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..... 23 February 2012 16:25
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Originally Posted by
We had, as all the kids did, to walk a 5 min. trek to the Tram / Bus and when we got off a 20 min. walk to school. Did not mind as there were so many interesting thing to do and see on the Way. My school was in a slum clearance area which meant half demolished, empty shops,pubs and railway stables. A great place for two brothers to explore. both going and coming from school. Regarding Colins nostalgic Post earlier The only girl you asked "Do you go all the way" worked on the Buses.
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Old Sweat (Puddle Jumper) 23 February 2012 16:28
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Originally Posted by
Colin,my last gainfull employment before my heart problems force my early retirement was as a Caretaker in a Private girls school.Never once did I see pupils walking to School.Range Rovers(worth more than my house when i bought it) were the usual mode of School Run.Shankss Pony? no chance!
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Syd Jones 23 February 2012 18:22
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Originally Posted by
Colin. Colin! Cod liver oil & malt! Or as a Black Country urchin knew it, Codli vroilunmalt Manna from heaven. Mind you it was 70 plus years ago, so I dont know what todays reaction might be, but my favourite as a child has to be Dip On the rare occasions when beef was roasting in the oven, mother would take a slice of bread and dip it in the roasting pan handing out a slice to each of us kids. Hot fat running over our fingers, screams of pain choked off by sheer greed. Delectable! Another favourite was a condensed milk sandwich... Anyone remember salmon & shrimp paste, those little jars of a poor mans pate? My father would recite a little ditty from somewhere. Dear mother. Lifes a bu--er. Sell the pig and buy me out! Dear Son. Pig gone, soldier on. Cheers, Syd.
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Nobby 23 February 2012 18:33
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Originally Posted by
Syd, across the road from the public baths [swimming pool] where we used to go, was a little shop which sold nothing else but buns dipped in hot dripping, with onions! This is an extract from a book Ive written, but which is unlikely ever to be published! ..." I recall very little of primary school, but Intermediate was at the High Colliery School, in Seaham on what was on the then A19, and memorable for a variety of reasons. Not all of them pleasant... The school was very old and with poor heating and no inside toilets. It had been condemned in 1939, but the war saved it apparently. We always regretted the fact that the Germans didn't bomb it when they had the chance. The roof leaked, and burst water pipes in winter were a regular occurrence. It was 102 years old before it finally gained an inside toilet, and that was for staff only. Oddly enough, despite my youth, [I was there from age 7 to 11], I can clearly recall both the Head Teacher, a Mr. Shipley, and his Deputy, a Mr. Page. I was a keen, but inadequate soccer player, and enjoyed outings to away games to many schools, some of them as far away as five miles. A huge distance for a kid! These trips had to be paid for however, and I recall many an occasion being ushered onto the bus despite not having come up with the few pence required of each boy. Money was always a problem in our house. I suppose we were relatively poor, but as everyone else was in the same boat, we didn't actually know we were poor, and therefore didn't care. It simply wasn't an issue without the pressure of today's commercialism and of course there was no TV! Mining communities were also enormously supportive of each other, and not only looked after their own, but were very generous to those who had even less than they did. I was often given items of clothing handed down in one family until there was no one else to whom it could be handed. There was no stigma attached to this, and such kindness was greeted with some pride in fact. A new item was new, no matter how many previous owners it had been through".
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Sigs 23 February 2012 18:45
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Originally Posted by
times gone by

Quoting: john daly We had, as all the kids did, to walk a 5 min. trek to the Tram / Bus and when we got off a 20 min. walk to school. Did not mind as there were so many interesting thing to do and see on the Way. My school was in a slum clearance area which meant half demolished, empty shops,pubs and railway stables. A great place for two brothers to explore. both going and coming from school. Regarding Colins nostalgic Post earlier The only girl you  asked "Do you go all the way" worked on the Buses. You lot were so lucky/ there was a scrap yard at the back of our house and our old lady would stand in the front room looking out of the window for the rag a bone men to come to the yard .She would go in the Yard looking in the carts for anything that would fit us kids and I mean anything shoes,coats,jackets the lot . And while all that was going on the old feller would be working in the coal industry up north he only came home at the month end. Happy days .
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Little Mo 23 February 2012 19:31
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Originally Posted by
I still use malt and cod liver oil every winter, my children were raised with it and to this day my whole family still love it.
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..... 23 February 2012 20:32
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: george woolley You lot were so lucky/ there was a scrap yard at the back of our house and our old lady would stand in the front room looking out of the window for the rag a bone men to come to the yard .She would go in the Yard looking in the carts for anything that would fit us kids and I mean anything shoes,coats,jackets the lot . And while all that was going on the old feller would be working in the coal industry up north he only came home at the month end. Happy days . You were lucky George. Our Mam used to load up us 28 kids on tandcart tek us dahn to the park and the Ducks would feed us old bread. Talking about Rag and bone men me Mam once swopped me and our kid for a Goldfish.
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Ros Comain. 23 February 2012 22:25
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Originally Posted by
The Lady who wrote the article in the mail was certainly right, we were fortunate to have lived through those times. Like most of the posters I also remember the school milk, the malt, cod liver oil, senna pods, dripping sadwiches, sweet coupons, the rag and bone men, also the gas lamp lighters. This was a time when we felt free to wander the streets from dawn until dusk, during school hoilidays, playing cricket football rugby, ambling up to Headingley cricket ground and making money from the empty bottles, if the spectators did not want them, making our bogies as we called them, or carts, out of wood and pram wheels, rope for the steering, racing down the paths in the park, if we were lucky the wooden brake worked, if not cuts and bruises. My favourite treat as a kid was pork pie which had just come out of the oven, the jelly running and not set, the taste was out of this world, the only place that I know of, where you can still experience that taste, is a small butchers in Otley near Leeds. As has already been said, most of us were in the same boat, second hand clothes, free school dinners for most of us, subsequently there was not the pressure on us as the kids to-day, You have to wonder how parents managed to bring up large famies, on low incomes, or how children survived, without the assistance and advice which is churned out to-day.
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Sigs 24 February 2012 00:35
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Originally Posted by
times past

Hi Michael . I think it was all about living within your means IE no credit cards no HP. no Cars .My first bike came out of the scap yard a bit at a time it cost nothing . When I left school in 47 i did go into HP for a good bike to get to work as a apprentice plumber half a crown a week .my wage was two quid my mum took half .But I still will say happy times ,todays kids do not know what it was all about. We had the best and saw the best of this great country . Today in tesco a lad about 20 took a butty and drink and paid with a credit card ,but that is norm . I have not got credit card and will never have one . moan moan .
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Spud 24 February 2012 01:18
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Originally Posted by
Well, Im just a lad but I remember cod liver oil, fried bread or champs sometimes for tea, itchy woolly trousers, walking to school a couple of times a week and spending the saved fare on 1/2 ounce of Old Holborn, being a mug for dares resulting in getting caned a lot, a whack from a copper (didnt feel like it at the time but it was better than going to the magistrates and getting a conviction), saving up pennies for the latest Airfix model airplane or warship (after a break of 40 years Ive started doing that again!), slam door trains that had guards, breaking a leg at school (no OSH, Labour Dept investigation, or talk of suing in those days - I was happy to get a few weeks off school), playing on the common and bomb sites all day, warm milk at school and school dinners for a bob,.......the list goes on. But it wasnt all good, I remember classmates in leg irons from polio.
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Spud 24 February 2012 01:20
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Originally Posted by
Well, Im just a lad but I remember cod liver oil, fried bread or champs sometimes for tea, itchy woolly trousers, walking to school a couple of times a week and spending the saved fare on 1/2 ounce of Old Holborn, being a mug for dares resulting in getting caned a lot, a whack from a copper (didnt feel like it at the time but it was better than going to the magistrates and getting a conviction), saving up pennies for the latest Airfix model airplane or warship (after a break of 40 years Ive started doing that again!), slam door trains that had guards, breaking a leg at school (no OSH, Labour Dept investigation, or talk of suing in those days - I was happy to get a few weeks off school), playing on the common and bomb sites all day, warm milk at school and school dinners for a bob,.......the list goes on. But it wasnt all good, I remember classmates in leg irons from polio.
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Raymond Hall 24 February 2012 01:42
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Originally Posted by
cyger family 174 general

good to see you posting again tutae wara pakha. looks like along with countless thousands of others had the same kind of childhood, but they were GOOD DAYS, and i wish we could go back to them,unfortunatly its not possible.but at least we have those memories,the current generation doesnt, its up to them ,to creat there own good memories, so that40 years down the line they can also say they were good old dats ray
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Spud 24 February 2012 01:47
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: raymond hall good to see you posting again tutae wara pakha. looks like along with countless thousands of others had the same kind of childhood, but they were GOOD DAYS, and i wish we could go back to them,unfortunatly its not possible.but at least we have those memories,the current generation doesnt, its up to them ,to creat there  own good memories, so that40 years down the line they can also say they were good old dats    ray By the way, we had small groups of real live friends, not hundreds of on line Facebook friends. Little Flea.
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Raymond Hall 24 February 2012 02:19
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Originally Posted by
cyber family 174 generalyour

your right there gerard, but more importantly we had neighbours whose door was always open to you and i9n times of troubleyou knewthat come what may they would always be there for each other i have lived in my present home for 18yrs and i can honestly say that apart from 3 families those kind of neighbours no longer exist, not gecause thet are bad people,its because society as a whole has lost the trust that you need to feel safe ,hope you understand where ime comming from. ray
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Roly01 24 February 2012 03:37
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Originally Posted by
Bunch of old foggies doing the "I remember bit"!!! I am sure that you will all survive the modern age though, due to your training in the hardships in life and the fact that you had to work for your own fun. Mums at home looking after the littleuns and you free to get into mischief and none of the PC rubbish that we have today. Kids today can be like us, but society does not let them do what we did. Fear of litigation is also a problem as well. Life is not as we remember, but it is still out there and needs US to bring it out in youth today. Join a youth group and help keep them off the streets. It will make you all feel younger as well.
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Raymond Hall 24 February 2012 07:04
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Originally Posted by
cyber family 174 generalgood times

dear roly.i dont often disagree with you,in fact up to date i dont think i have, but with your reference to old time foggies" ime afraid I have to. you seem to forget that the 16 19 20 tr olds are tomorrows future,and o them,what you and I think doent mean athing thanks to the welfare state,if they cant get a job centrelink will provide for them,as long as they go through the motions of looking for a job. and they get paid more than my pension! and I have been working for 60 yrs. there is no incentive for them to work so in a lot of cases they say why should I.I better stop now before I get really wound up.nothing personal mate ,just an old foggies opinion regards ray
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Steve Greenwood 24 February 2012 08:28
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Originally Posted by
I agree with you, Roly. We tend to remember our childhood days with nostalgia because they were the days that were imprinted on our minds. The generation that followed us have their own memories of a safer world that had Nuclear weapons and other wars like Korea and Suez and, later the Falklands. It appears to me that we never learn from our mistakes or failures because we still have young men and women dying in far off lands. Maybe they were the Good old days in many peoples minds but dont dig too much under the surface because you may be surprised in what you find .
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Bomber 24 February 2012 10:18
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Originally Posted by
You can still get cod liver oil and malt from Boots last week they were selling it buy two jars and get one free, my old lemon and me take it every day in the winter, a true reminder of the old days when as kids we would line up and have a spoonful each all with the same spoon, can you see that happening to-day?
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Scouse 24 February 2012 14:01
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Originally Posted by
Syd Jones did you say "Dip" was when you had BEEF and red hot fat or dripping running over your hands. What was beef?? My mother told us all the animals on four legs were moved away to other countries . I cant remember having any kind of meat or anything that wasnt powdered. The dip we had was a large bowl of chicken or other bones boiled up and we dipped our bread into the resulting fluids. Beef??? were you middle class?? One of 7 kids.
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Terry Carey 24 February 2012 16:14
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Originally Posted by
Times past

Quoting: raymond hall dear roly.i dont often disagree with you,in fact up to date i dont think i have, but with your reference to old time foggies" ime afraid I have to. you seem to forget that the 16 19 20 tr olds are tomorrows future,and o them,what you and I think doent mean athing thanks to the welfare state,if they cant get a job centrelink will provide for them,as long as they go through the motions of looking for a job. and they get paid more than my pension! and I have been working for 60 yrs. there is no incentive for them to work so in a lot of cases they say why should I.I better stop now before I get really wound up.nothing personal mate ,just an old foggies opinion regards ray Hi Ray, I think you rather missed Rolys humour in his remarks. Hes not calling anyone so I think, with all respect, you ought to just lighten up. We old buggers whove been around on here for a while all know him and hes NEVER nasty. TC.
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