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On This Day.

{{forumThread.upVotes}} Created by Terry Carey 6 September 2007 14:21 309768 views Link  
Terry Carey 6 September 2007 14:21
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Originally Posted by
On This Day.

Some years ago I entered a TV competition which was a weekly one where the Weatherman for Granada TV offered a prize for the best explanation or answer to the week's question.  The one I sent in was the answer to 'Where does the expression "In the nick of time" come from'. My prize for winning was The Wordsworth Book of Days.  It gives examples of such things as who was born, died, invented something, was hanged, or cites famous events etc. Looking at the reference for today's date I note that in 1888 Joseph (Patrick) Kennedy was born and became the founder of the Kennedy clan. In 1666 the Great Fire of London was finally extinguished having started on the 2nd Sept of that year. In 1987 Indian military scientists announced they had successfully devised a long-life chapati using a preservative which keeps the unleavened bread fresh for months. In 1989 A computer error resulted in 41,000 Parisians receiving letters charging them with murder, extortion and organised prostitution instead of traffic fines!!!!!!!  (That's made my day - I don't know about yours.) Look forward to more fascinating snippets as the days go by.  Especially look out on the 11th September!!! Anyone wishing to add their own On This Day memories or whatever then please feel free. The more the merrier. Terry. Last edited by Terry Carey
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John Richards 6 September 2007 14:50
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Originally Posted by
Terrys Prize

I know this is a silly question, but exactly what is the origin of the expression in the nick of time? For the winner:- a bound copy of Terry Carey: The early Years.
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Mike Pass 6 September 2007 18:17
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Originally Posted by
Terrys book of stuff

Very slight divert Terrace. Another fascinating tome is Brewers Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. For some obscure reason I no longer have mine. I am sure that for anyone who has or has had a copy will agree that it is indispensable!
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Terry Carey 7 September 2007 13:25
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: john richards I know this is a silly question, but exactly what is the origin of the expression 'in the nick of time'? For the winner:- a bound copy of 'Terry Carey: The early Years'. Its no good me giving the answer because Id then have to award myself the prize and I havent finished writing the book yet. I actually have started one but its already 200,000 words long and Im only up to the age of four. I had a busy childhood!!!! The winner gets the first part of my story about my time in Khaki. That lets MP out because hes already read it. Terry.
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(Unknown Name) 7 September 2007 14:39
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: john richards I know this is a silly question, but exactly what is the origin of the expression 'in the nick of time'? For the winner:- a bound copy of 'Terry Carey: The early Years'. JJ, In the nick of time Meaning: Without a second to spare. Example: Origin: Even into the 18th century, some businessmen kept track of transactions and time by carving notches (nicks) on a "tally stick." Someone arriving just before the next nick was carved would arrive in time to save the next days interest - in the nick of time. P.S. You can keep the prize, absolutely not interested.
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Cassandra 7 September 2007 14:45
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Originally Posted by
T.C.  I also have a book, well it's a diary really, of Forgotten English. Entry for today: Checquer: 7th Sept. (1726-1795). Birthday of Francois Philidor. Briefly...chess master immigrated to England in 1740's, where he received a pension from the London Chess Club.(Nothing new there then !!!).  Game first played in 1400's though names and moves have changed.  (Details followed). Chess boards were made of wood, bone or even ivory, the last being valued at three cows or six pence.  The Church once condemned the game, and many chess boards-ivory or not were burned. Not a lot of people know that S.O.McK. P.S. eventriqueness.....corpulence formed on Latin ventrem...belly. Last edited by sheila ormiston
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Terry Carey 7 September 2007 17:45
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Originally Posted by
On This Day

On this day in 1533 Elizabeth 1st was born as was Group Captain Leonard Cheshire in 1917, Anna Mary Robertson aka Grandma Moses in 1860 and in 1936 Charles Hardin Holly aka Buddy Holly. Deaths included Catherine Parr - 1548 and Keith Moon in 1978. In 1943 Italy surrendered to the Allies. Sheila thank you for that little snippet and like you say - Not a lot of people know that. By the way can you do a Michael Caine impression? Apropos the competition since there was only one entry of uncertain provenance it is hereby declared closed. Regarding the disinterest I doubt if anyone cares. I may, however, at some date in the future give the absolutely pukka dinka info which won me the prize and predates the single reply by almost two thousand years. Till then my good and gentle friendly folk - You know who you are - adios. Terry. Thats me on the right - the southpaw one.
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John Richards 7 September 2007 18:21
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: Patricia Davies JJ, In the nick of time  Meaning: Without a second to spare. Example:   Origin: Even into the 18th century, some businessmen kept track of transactions and time by carving notches (nicks) on a "tally stick." Someone arriving just before the next nick was carved would arrive in time to save the next day's interest - in the nick of time. P.S. You can keep the prize, absolutely not interested. MISS ! ! ! Ooohhh...did you hear that? Patricia Davies said nicks again!
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John (Scouse) Hirons 7 September 2007 20:20
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: john richards I know this is a silly question, but exactly what is the origin of the expression 'in the nick of time'? For the winner:- a bound copy of 'Terry Carey: The early Years'. Alright John, I cheated & Googled it So I quote:- Nick meaning the precise moment is first found in the 1570s and was said to have been common by the late sixteenth century; nick of time itself is recorded from the middle of the seventeenth centuy. The literal use of nick a small notch is found in the late fifteenth century. The ultimate origin of this nick is uncertain." The expression about three centuries old, formed when someone added the redundant of time to the older expression, in the nick, which meant the same thing. A nick is a groove, a notch, as made with a sharp knife when one cuts a V in a stick of wood. Nothing could express precision more accurately than a notch so formed, especially when applied to time answer supplied by EduQnA.com
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Mike Pass 7 September 2007 20:50
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Originally Posted by
Hhhhmmmmm!!!!!!!!

Quoting: Terry Carey I The winner gets the first part of my story about my time in Khaki.  That lets MP out because he's already read it.   Terry. Yeah, yeah! No surprise there then. Sidelined once more through no fault of my own!!!!!!!
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Terry Carey 7 September 2007 23:27
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Originally Posted by
On This Day

Pin back your lugholes as Cyril Fletcher (who?) used to say. More accurately read, mark, learn, and inwardly digest as we were taught at school. Sometimes we were tense as well.(LOL) The origin of the expression In the nick of time is from many years ago. In early times the passage of time has been measured by many means, often rudimentary. By the sun and moon mainly in primitive times. However as mankind became more sophisticated such things as water clocks and weighted clock mechanisms were invented. Going back to the days when timepieces were not commonplace items and before the practice of enamelling clock and watch faces was introduced the hours were marked on the faces by nicks. This is of course one of the synonyms denoting this kind of marking. Nick, nock and notch are all basically descriptions of the same thing. The faces were usually of brass during this period. However, long before this it was discovered that candles could be made to burn evenly and within fairly close limits as to the length of time they burned for a given size. Therefore if nicks were made in the candles at measured intervals then the passage of time could be reasonably well observed. These nicks were made more prominent or visible by the rubbing in of soot. People ariving at the appointed time when a certain nick was reached were thus said to have arrived In or at the Nick of Time. In fact the original saying was more likely to have been at rather than in. Terry.
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Roly01 8 September 2007 00:46
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Originally Posted by
OOooo!Aaaaahr"!!!! You lot be so clever with the words.... Is think you lot is real toffs, teaching us edification and orl that. Now nick off.!!!!!!
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John (Scouse) Hirons 8 September 2007 13:51
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: Arthur Rowsell 'OOooo!Aaaaahr"!!!!   You lot be so clever with the words.... I's think you lot is real toff's, teaching us edification and orl that. Now 'nick off'.!!!!!! Alright Athur, At wun time Tes cuddnt evun spel brain surjin now e r wun.
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John Richards 8 September 2007 15:45
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: Terry Carey Pin back your lugholes as Cyril Fletcher (who?) used to say.  More accurately read, mark, learn, and inwardly digest as we were taught at school.  Sometimes we were tense as well.(LOL) Nick, nock and notch are all basically descriptions of the same thing.   Terry.   Has this anything to do with knickers, knackers and knockers? I only arsked! John, (2nd year infants).
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(Unknown Name) 8 September 2007 16:28
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: john richards Has this anything to do with knickers, knackers and knockers? I only arsked! John, (2nd year infants). Ooh JJ The things kids say!!!haha I know I have 2 out of 3 and I cant wait to see your reply on that. Scouse is thinking one up right now.
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John Richards 8 September 2007 16:37
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: Patricia Davies Ooh JJ The things kids say!!!haha I know I have 2 out of 3 and I can't wait to see your reply on that. Scouse is thinking one up right now. Bearing in mind, Patricia, they all come in pairs, you have 4 out of 6. I can say that from experience, because Im always bearing you in mind. Scouse made me say that, honest!
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Cassandra 8 September 2007 17:16
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: Arthur Rowsell 'OOooo!Aaaaahr"!!!!   You lot be so clever with the words.... I's think you lot is real toff's, teaching us edification and orl that. Now 'nick off'.!!!!!! Rowly, I keep telling Terry to use more flannel if he wants to win hearts and minds, but he just doesnt listen ! Sheila.
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Terry Carey 8 September 2007 18:06
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Originally Posted by
On This Day

Im deaf to idiocy and those who spout rubbish Sheila but I always listen to you. However, On this day in 1157 Richard 1st, King of England was born; in 1886 Siegfried Sassoon who won the MC in World War 1 arrived followed in 1931 by Jack Rosenthal, playwright. Two of the Goons share this birthday as well - Sir Harry Secombe in 1921 and Peter (Richard Henry) Sellers in 1925. Ann Lee, English born leader of the Shakers died in 1784; 1949 saw the demise of Richard Strauss, German composer of Der rosenkavalier. In 1888 the first football League matches were played. Anyone wishing to add to this thread along these lines is welcome. Debate is also encouraged - arent I the generous one - (???????????) TC.
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Cassandra 8 September 2007 18:13
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: Terry Carey I'm deaf to idiocy and those who spout rubbish Sheila but I always listen to you.   However, On this day in 1157 Richard 1st, King of England was born; in 1886 Siegfried Sassoon who won the MC in World War 1 arrived followed in 1931 by Jack Rosenthal, playwright.  Two of the Goons share this birthday as well - Sir Harry Secombe in 1921 and Peter (Richard Henry) Sellers in 1925. Ann Lee, English born leader of the Shakers died in 1784;  1949 saw the demise of Richard Strauss, German composer of Der rosenkavalier. In 1888 the first football League matches were played. Anyone wishing to add to this thread along these lines is welcome.  Debate is also encouraged - aren't I the generous one - (???????????) TC.   Not strictly in tune with the thread, but if I don't get it off my chest now, short term memory will erase instantly. Who actually were the first Foot ball team. S.O.McK. P.S. Should save this one for Monday, 10th September. On that day in 1957 my son Mark was born. As he may monopolise this "comp" for the day, I probably will not be able to publish this then. Also we are sworn to silence and will be wearing black arm bands as he is FIFTY!, and hates it. Thank you for your attention. S.O.McK. Last edited by sheila ormiston
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John Richards 8 September 2007 18:19
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: sheila ormiston Not strictly in tuen with the thread, but if I don't get it off my chest now, short term memory will erase instantly. Who actually were the first Foot ball team. S.O.McK. Poor Sheila! How do you manage to breathe with a football team on your chest?
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John Richards 8 September 2007 18:33
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Originally Posted by
William II

On this day, 1056, William Rufus, son of William I was born. The reign of William Rufus Was a most inauspicious affair. He was known in the main For his rather short reign, And the flowing red locks of his hair. The hair he got from his mother, The crown that he wore was his Dads, And the arrow that came at the end of his reign Was a token of thanks from the lads! BOOM BOOM!
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Terry Carey 8 September 2007 19:49
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Originally Posted by
On This Day

Nice one John. Full marks and a silver star. It would have been a golden one but youre a meanie about the jazz musician. Sheila, The book doesnt give the names of the first league clubs although I have a sneaking suspicion that Oldham Athletic were thereabouts. Ill bet Scouse will know - theyre all football mad in Liverpool. Terry.
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John (Scouse) Hirons 8 September 2007 23:22
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: Terry Carey Sheila, I'll bet Scouse will know - they're all football mad in Liverpool. Terry. Alright Terry, There was no 1st game. they were timed to start simultaneously Final League Table 1888 1 Preston North End 2 Aston Villa 3 Wolverhampton Wanderers 4 Blackburn Rovers 5 Bolton Wanderers 6 West Bromwich Albion 7 Accrington 8 Everton 9 Burnley 10 Derby County 11 Notts County 12 Stoke
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(Unknown Name) 9 September 2007 00:40
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: John (scouse) Hirons Alright Terry, There was no 1st game. they were timed to start simultaneously Final League Table 1888    1  Preston North End    2  Aston Villa    3  Wolverhampton Wanderers    4  Blackburn Rovers    5  Bolton Wanderers    6  West Bromwich Albion    7  Accrington    8  Everton    9  Burnley   10  Derby County     11  Notts County   12  Stoke Shouldnt this be omn the sports channel? Or did they all start on the same day? This day. This day TC and PD agreed that they both didnt give a damn.
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(Unknown Name) 9 September 2007 00:51
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Originally Posted by
On this day, in any one of the last 60 years a or so, I havent the faintest idea what I was doing
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The Friend 9 September 2007 08:28
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: Colin Hall On this day, in any one of the last 60 years a or so, I haven't the faintest idea what I was doing  I can tell you what I was doing on the 09 09 60 at 1100hrs That was the exact time I recieved the Queens schilling,spent it 10 mins later on a cuppa, and I have been laughing aver since. Who else joined up today for X years Last edited by Matthew Percival
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John Richards 9 September 2007 12:03
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Originally Posted by
On this day, 60 years ago, I asked Patricia Davies for a kiss, and her Mum put her back in her pram and threatened to call the police!
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(Unknown Name) 9 September 2007 13:37
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: john richards On this day, 60 years ago, I asked Patricia Davies for a kiss, and her Mum put her back in her pram and threatened to call the police!   My Mum's not here now JJ Ask again.   I can call the police myself. Last edited by Patricia Davies
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Terry Carey 9 September 2007 13:47
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Originally Posted by
On This Day

On this day 60 years ago I would no doubt have been wishing my sister a happy birthday. I would have been working as a Junior clerk in the Office of the Fox Mill - my first job (if it was a working day - if not probably out flying my model aircraft) However, on this day in 1754 William Bligh later Captain of the Bounty was born; in 1087 William the Conqueror died from injuries sustained when his horse stumbled. In 1963 Jim Clark became the worlds youngest motor racing champion driving a Lotus. Tune in tomorrow for some more snippets from history. Please feel free to add your own - please - otherwise well all die of boredom. (I said it first so no one need add sarky comments.) Terry.
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Cassandra 9 September 2007 15:47
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: John (scouse) Hirons Alright Terry, There was no 1st game. they were timed to start simultaneously Final League Table 1888    1  Preston North End    2  Aston Villa    3  Wolverhampton Wanderers    4  Blackburn Rovers    5  Bolton Wanderers    6  West Bromwich Albion    7  Accrington    8  Everton    9  Burnley   10  Derby County     11  Notts County   12  Stoke I was airing a bit of knowledge gained from the T.V. only last week. Apparently it was in Sheffield that a team with matching strip was formed. If you find out more info, please let me know, so that I can use it again to drop into the conversation when in sporty company. S.O.McK.
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Cassandra 9 September 2007 15:56
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Originally Posted by
Picking up the thread. 10th September 1585 birthday of Cardinal Richelieu. Minister of State to Louis X111 of France. Was known for ruthlessly crushing opposition to the Monarchy. Now who was it that commented on someones big ears and their camel ???? S.O.McK. P.S. 9th September 1957. I remember it well...I was in labour !!!
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Soft Southern Barsteward 9 September 2007 18:01
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Originally Posted by
In labour madam

If you had been a bit more consevative,and not so liberal with your affection,you would not have been in labour,but love does such strange things to one does it not? no disrespect to your honour mam.
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John Richards 9 September 2007 18:35
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: Patricia Davies My Mum's not here now JJ Ask again.   I can call the police myself. Last edited by Patricia Davies RATS!! Foiled again! Once again my love life, like my underwear, is in shreds. My old Mum used to say:- Those who ask dont get. Those who dont ask dont want.
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Celtic Maiden 9 September 2007 18:53
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Originally Posted by
Sheila

Sheila we have something in common for the 10th September. That date in 1988 was the day my son was born. He will be 19yrs old tomorrow. So I guess my life changed forever on that day; for the better I may add On 10th Sept 2001, we had a wonderful party for his 13th birthday and his transition to a teenager, stretch limo and dinner at a Country House Hotel (he felt very grown up going there instead of Burger King!!). Unfortunately the very next day, we came down to earth with a bump with the tragic events of 9/11 and unfortunately the whole world changed forever.
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Cassandra 9 September 2007 19:20
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: Theresa Campbell Sheila we have something in common for the 10th September. That date in 1988 was the day my son was born.  He will be 19yrs old tomorrow. So I guess my life changed forever on that day; for the better I may add On 10th Sept 2001, we had a wonderful party for his 13th birthday and his transition to a teenager, stretch limo and dinner at a Country House Hotel (he felt very grown up going there instead of Burger King!!). Unfortunately the very next day, we came down to earth with a bump with the tragic events of 9/11 and unfortunately the whole world changed forever. Theresa my brother, now dead, was also born on the 10th and my only other brother, who is still living on, the 11th. Not being an admirer of the U.S. establishment I, nevertheless, have the greatest admiration for the firemen and others who were there that day. It is still a horribly memerising spectacle. As for the birth of my son, unfortunately it was at a time when things were not at their best for me. However, both of my children have been the best thing that ever happened to me. I saw your son in Bristol and must say hes a "bit fit" as they say to-day. Dont forget to visit. Sheila.
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Cassandra 9 September 2007 19:22
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: phillip strawn If you had been a bit more consevative,and not so liberal with your affection,you would not have been in labour,but love does such strange things to one does it not?  no disrespect to your honour mam. I was bush-whacked !!!!!!! S.O.McK.
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Celtic Maiden 9 September 2007 19:36
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: sheila ormiston As for the birth of my son, unfortunately it was at a time when things were not at their best for me. However, both of my children have been the best thing that ever happened to me. I saw your son in Bristol and must say he's a "bit fit" as they say to-day. Don't forget to visit.  Sheila. I empathise completely Sheila. That day for me also brings joy out of what could have been great sadness as it is a miracle we are both here to tell the tale. Two months earlier I suffered what is known today as PTSD due to the Piper Alpha disaster and almost lost my unborn baby at 7 months.....to cut a long story short, pre-eclampsia turned into eclampsia just as he was being born. I look at him today and am extremely proud. I shall never forget my faith both in God and the medical profession. Your description of him as being a bit fit made me laugh. He has quite a following with the FR ladies. We are looking forward to seeing you again perhaps next May in the Midlands? We would love to come to the Island one day, and you of course are very welcome to visit us here in Wales....take care xx
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John Richards 10 September 2007 13:07
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: sheila ormiston I was bush-whacked !!!!!!!  S.O.McK. Ive all sorts of stories about the bushes on the Island, Sheila!
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Cassandra 10 September 2007 13:11
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: john richards I've all sorts of stories about the bushes on the Island, Sheila! Funny you should say that John. There was a kid at the bus stop the other day and he reminded me of someone, but couldnt think who ?????? S.O.McK.
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John Richards 10 September 2007 13:24
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: sheila ormiston Funny you should say that John.  There was a kid at the bus stop the other day and he reminded me of someone, but couldn't think who ??????  S.O.McK. If that kid had been in his middle to late 50s I might have blushed, Sheila!
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Terry Carey 10 September 2007 13:34
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Originally Posted by
On This Day

Quoting: sheila ormiston Picking up the thread. 10th September 1585 birthday of Cardinal Richelieu.  Minister of State to Louis X111 of France.  Was known for ruthlessly crushing opposition to the Monarchy. Now who was it that commented on someone's big ears and their camel ???? S.O.McK. P.S. 9th September 1957.  I remember it well...I was in labour !!!   Oy Sheila, Wot you doin Gel? Pre-empting thats wot!!!!! However, please pass on my best wishes to your son. Also best wishes to Theresas son who we have just learned also made his way into this world on this day. On This Day in 1771 Mungo Park was born. He was a Scottish surgeon and explorer of the true course of the Niger. His first expedition made him famous but his second led to his death. Bet he wished hed stayed at home after the first one. In 1855 Robert Koldewey German archeologist arrived who later (obviously) discovered Babylon and the foundations of the tower of Babel (it says here) Charles Cruft, founder of the famous dog show died in 1938 and in 1983 Balthazar Johannes Vorster former Prime Minister of South Africa followed him - in a manner of speaking. In 1894 London taxi driver George Smith became the first person to be convicted for drunken driving while in charge of an electric cab in Bond Street. He was fined twenty shillings or 1£ - it says here. Terry. PS Sheila - according to my book Cardinal Richelieu was born on the 9th. Have you got a different book to me? (LOL) Or, could it be delayed fatigue?
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John Richards 10 September 2007 17:47
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: Terry Carey PS Sheila - according to my book Cardinal Richelieu was born on the 9th. Have you got a different book to me? (LOL)  Or, could it be delayed fatigue?   Well now, Sheila and Terry are both correct. It was a very long and difficult delivery. From:- "A Treatise on Obstetric and Gynaecological Anomolies. Vol.XVI" Last edited by john richards
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Terry Carey 11 September 2007 15:53
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Originally Posted by
On This Day.

I think weve got a Gremlin or two on here. I posted a reply yesterday and it hasnt shown up yet. Ah well - Born - On This Day in 1700 James Thompson, Scottish poet. He wrote Rule Britannia (Hmmm!!!) Wonder what the Home Rule Scots think of him now???? In 1885 David Herbert Lawrence who wrote Lady Chatterleys Lover which became famous for the obscenity trial about it. In 1917 Herbert Lom - who was actually named Herbert Charles Angelo Kuchacevich ze Schluderpacheru. Imagine that on Cinema Bills. Today - dont know what year Sheilas older brother was born so all the best to him Sheila. Incidentally in 1930 I arrived and if you look at the attachment youll see what I got for my birthday today. On This Day in 1971 Nikita Kruschev former Soviet Premier died in obscurity. In 1895 the FA Cup was stolen from football outfitters William Shillcock in Birmingham. 68 years later (1963) an 83 year old man confess that he had melted it down to make counterfeit half-crown coins. Terry.
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John (Scouse) Hirons 11 September 2007 17:44
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Originally Posted by
Alright Terry, Happy birthday to you, squashed tomatoes & stew. If you dont like em dont eat them, Happy bithday to you. You can supply the singing. Many happy returns mate.
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John Richards 11 September 2007 19:00
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Originally Posted by
Another song for Terry

Terry Carey is a funny un, Got a face like a pickled onion, And the hair on his dicky dido Hangs down to his knees. From Dolly Partons Biggestits H A P P Y B I R T H D A Y
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Cassandra 12 September 2007 09:36
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: Terry Carey I think we've got a Gremlin or two on here.  I posted a reply yesterday and it hasn't shown up yet. Ah well - Born - On This Day in 1700 James Thompson, Scottish poet.  He wrote Rule Britannia (Hmmm!!!)  Wonder what the 'Home Rule' Scots think of him now???? In 1885 David Herbert Lawrence who wrote 'Lady Chatterley's Lover' which became famous for the obscenity trial about it. In 1917 Herbert Lom - who was actually named Herbert Charles Angelo Kuchacevich ze Schluderpacheru.  Imagine that on Cinema Bills. Today - don't know what year Sheila's older brother was born so all the best to him Sheila. Incidentally in 1930 I arrived and if you look at the attachment you'll see what I got for my birthday today. On This Day in 1971 Nikita Kruschev former Soviet Premier died in obscurity. In 1895 the FA Cup was stolen from  football outfitters William Shillcock in Birmingham.  68 years later (1963) an 83 year old man confess that he had melted it down to make counterfeit half-crown coins. Terry. T.C. On 11th September, 1930 my PEDANTIC older brother was born. For you sceptics. Terry; My Son Mark; My Brother David are all Virgos. My son has just moved house, Terry has just moved house and my brother is just about to move house. All have down sized. Makes ye think dont it !!!! So T.C. A VERY HAPPY BIRTHDAY and many more to come. Sheila.
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Terry Carey 12 September 2007 15:34
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Originally Posted by
On This Day.

First of all many thanks to you my friends for your good wishes including the ones sent privately. Loved the funny card Mike - dont know how you got the photograph for it though!!!!! On This Day in 1853 Herbert Asquith was born. He introduced old age pensions. Cheers Herbert!!!!! Also arriving at Platform 12 were Maurice Chevalier, entertainer, in 1888 and he was preceded by Richard Jordan Gatling US inventor of the famous Gatling gun. Among those who popped their clogs on this day were William Boyd aka Hopalong Cassidy in 1972 and well before that in 1869 Dr Peter Mark Roget who complied his famed Thesaurus. In the miscellaneous section Fred Perry became wimbledon Champion in 1936, MOT testing introduced in 1960 and in 1974 Emperor Haille Selassie of Ethiopia aka The Lion of Judah was deposed by a military coup. Still looking for other contributions as per Sheilas makes ye think dont it? snippet. Terry.
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John Richards 12 September 2007 17:31
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Originally Posted by
William Boyd

It is not my nature to be pedantic, Terry, especially on your birthday, but surely if William Boyd was Hopalong Cassidy, he popped his clog.
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Terry Carey 14 September 2007 15:04
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Originally Posted by
On This Day

Sorry for the hiatus in replying John but yesterday was full of wonderful things I had to do. Like filling in lots of forms because weve moved house, chasing up a refund on the Insurance premium on our previous house and other delightful goodies. Lets see now - William Boyd aka Hopalong Cassidy popping his clog (singular)? Makes a kind of sense I suppose - Ill let you off that one. On This Day in 1910 Jack Hawkins actor was born as was Jan Masaryk in 1886 who became Czech Foreign Minister. In 1851 James Fennimore Cooper who wrote the book The Last of the Mohicans died. A year later off went the Duke of Wellington whose state funeral was the largest until that of Winston Churchill. In 1752 the Gregorian Calender superseded the Julian one (Named after Julius Caesar) and September the 3rd became September the 14th. At school we were told that many of the people demonstrated in the belief that their lives were being shortened by 11 days crying out Give us back our eleven days. In 1814 the US National Anthem was written by Francis Scott Key following the shelling by the British of Fort McHenry on the 13th. It was set to an English drinking song called To Anacreon in Heaven and was adopted as the National Anthem in 1931. (Dont know about you folks but that gave me a good laugh and Ill bet there arent many Yanks who would appreciate the fact that their beloved anthem is to the tune of a p*ss-artists song!!!!) Terry. Still looking for personal anecdotes for this thread.
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Cassandra 14 September 2007 15:14
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: Terry Carey Sorry for the hiatus in replying John but yesterday was full of wonderful things I had to do.  Like filling in lots of forms because we've moved house, chasing up a refund on the Insurance premium on our previous house and other delightful goodies. Let's see now - William Boyd aka Hopalong Cassidy popping his clog (singular)?   Makes a kind of sense I suppose - I'll let you off that one. On This Day in 1910 Jack Hawkins actor was born as was Jan Masaryk in 1886 who became Czech Foreign Minister. In 1851 James Fennimore Cooper who wrote the book 'The Last of the Mohicans' died. A year later off went the Duke of Wellington whose state funeral was the largest until that of Winston Churchill. In 1752 the Gregorian Calender superseded the Julian one (Named after Julius Caesar) and September the 3rd became September the 14th.  At school we were told that many of the people demonstrated in the belief that their lives were being shortened by 11 days crying out 'Give us back our eleven days.' In 1814 the US National Anthem was written by Francis Scott Key following the shelling by the British of Fort McHenry on the 13th.  It was set to an English drinking song called 'To Anacreon in Heaven' and was adopted as the National Anthem in 1931.  (Don't know about you folks but that gave me a good laugh and I'll bet there aren't many Yanks who would appreciate the fact that their beloved anthem is to the tune of a p*ss-artists song!!!!) Terry. Still looking for personal anecdotes for this thread.   T.C.  Not a personal anecdote, but am wondering if the bloke along the road who displays a different National flag each day, has the same book as you.  Today he has the French flag flying....any info on that.  Sheila O.McK. P.S. Antipodes..People whose feet are directly opposite to ours....Well of course. Last edited by sheila ormiston
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