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Christmases long gone.....

{{forumThread.upVotes}} Created by Mike Pass 9 December 2006 14:22 3312 views Link  
Mike Pass 9 December 2006 14:22
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Originally Posted by
Christmases long gone.....

A nine part album of Christmas photos from the 1910s to 1940s Pt 1.....
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Mike Pass 9 December 2006 14:23
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Originally Posted by
Long gone

Pt2......
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Mike Pass 9 December 2006 14:24
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Originally Posted by
Long gone

Pt3.....
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Mike Pass 9 December 2006 14:24
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Originally Posted by
Long gone

Pt 4.....
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Mike Pass 9 December 2006 14:25
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Originally Posted by
Long gone

Pt 5.....
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Mike Pass 9 December 2006 14:26
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Originally Posted by
Long gone

Pt6.....
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Mike Pass 9 December 2006 14:27
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Originally Posted by
Long gone

Pt 7.....
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Mike Pass 9 December 2006 14:28
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Originally Posted by
Long gone

Pt 8.....
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Mike Pass 9 December 2006 14:30
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Originally Posted by
Long gone

Pt 9..... Does this crew look like Scotland Yards most wanted or what????!!!! Incidentally, Pt 6 is aboard HMS Mermaid 1912
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Charlie Jenkins 9 December 2006 14:49
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Originally Posted by
Great pics Mick,trouble is it makes me feel my three score years and ten for I can remember wearing clothes just like the young lads in the pics we didnt have goose though it was either sandhole mutton [rabbit] or pheasant my father got with his catapult, catapults didnt awake the game keeper. Regards Charlie
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Cassandra 9 December 2006 14:49
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: Mick Pass Pt 9..... Does this crew look like Scotland Yard's 'most wanted' or what????!!!! Incidentally, Pt 6 is aboard HMS Mermaid 1912 Mick. Absolutely brilliant collection of pictures. I had a laugh when I saw the brass knobs on the bed. (Memories). Also the gas masks. We still have one of those shelters in the garden. They are virtually indestuctable. Now full of old bikes, etc. It gives me the creeps at the thought of being in one at this time of the year. Thanks again, theyre unique. Sheila (O) Ormiston.
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Smudge 9 December 2006 16:38
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Originally Posted by
Xmas

Hallo Mick. Good set of pics, I can particularly place myself with those shown in the Anderson Shelter having lived through all of WW2 and spending many hours in the one in our back garden, thankfully we did!. If I may say it all looks a little subdued compared with todays Xmas extremes, and I believe extremes they are. Speaking strictly for myself that then was the way I preferred/prefer it and I personally could well do without this dreadful (I think) commercialism which has taken over today. Sorry if my comments make me sound a bit of a wet blanket but my thoughts are my own which please excuse. Whilst being very grateful about many of todays general improvements in our way of life sadly it seems to me the old comraderie and "shareability" (to possibly coin a new word) are lacking and theres far to much of the "Im alright Jack attitude about". Its me age mate so do please bear with me, the expression "Hard up but happy" comes very much to mind about those days. Very best wishes to you. Syd.
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Terry Carey 9 December 2006 17:20
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Originally Posted by
Christmases long gone.

Hi Mick, Like Syd I can recall spending hours in our shelter and running down stairs in the middle of the night in my jim-jams to dive inside when the sirens went off. A few memories are when my big brother made some bunks and I said they werent strong enough. He proved they were by jumping onto the top one and finishing up on the concrete floor amid a pile of firewood. In Ashton-u-Lyne the Manchester Regiment Museum is situated in the Town Hall and I often have a browse round it. They change the displays from time to time and a couple of years ago they had an Anderson shelter (as shown in the pics) set up. An elderly couple (ahem - maybe only a couple of years older than my age) were looking inside it and when I tried to peep in the lady said she didnt remember them being so small. I had to agree - they must have shrunk or weve grown!!! There was one night when me and my Dad dared to stick our noses outside during an air raid. There was a German bomber twisting and turning to get away from the searchlights but it seemed to be hit by Ack-Ack fire. As it flew away my Dad said he saw it come down in the distance and said it with some satisfaction. I didnt know either way but hed gone right through the first World War so he knew better than me. regards, Terry.
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Cassandra 9 December 2006 19:04
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Originally Posted by
Having just read Syd and Terrys replies. Im glad that they, like me, appreciated the reminders. I have a correction to make. The shelter in our garden isnt an Anderson, the ones with earth over the top its a solid concrete one. Just a little add on. On my first visit to Majorca the hotel we stayed in must have been finished the day before we arrived. As I walked in I could smell cement and I just exclaimed "Air raid shelter", because that was what came into my mind. After a lot of years. Sheila O.
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Not So Long Ago! 10 December 2006 00:46
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Originally Posted by
Great pictures Mike! memories of days when Christmas meant so much and people appreciated things much more then today. Ron.
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(Unknown Name) 10 December 2006 14:45
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Originally Posted by
Dear Mr Anderson.

One of my very earliest memories, that which can be substantiated by fact,is of being carried into the Anderson in the back garden of our Council house.I didn't imagine it, because many years later I did some research and found that there was indeed an air raid in our area on the night of 16th May 1943 which demolished 113 houses and damaged a further 120. There were 33 killed, a remarkably small number considering the high-density of the housing, and 147 other casualties. Many of those bomb sites were still there in the 1950s! However, come 1955 and the Council decide it was time for the Andersons to be removed, and set about the demolition. I was walking home from school and there was a Council truck parked in the road, and a pile of bricks on the footpath, and a workman throwing the bricks, two at a time, onto the truck. He had his back to me, and I didn't want to walk past the truck on the road, so I waited until he paused in his rhythm. Well, he did stop, and I thought, right, time to pass him, and moved on, when he suddenly bent to his task again, picked up two bricks, swung to his left, and let go. One brick must have travelled all of three inches of its trajectory before it connected with my head! I saw stars, literally, and down I went! The poor guy picked me up and carted me off into the house and the wound was cleaned up and a plaster applied and Off I went home, not much the worse for wear except for a scar which I still have. Last edited by Colin Hall
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Smudge 10 December 2006 17:06
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Originally Posted by
Micks Pics

Hallo. Appologies for wandering away from the Xmas theme a little but I feel what I have to say is relevant and hopefully of interest. Loads of comments about the Anderson shelters. Living near East London at the time of WW2 we very glad we had ours. Speaking of those bunk beds there was a standard issue type which consisted of a stout wooden frame with a black metal strip framework nailed thereto. We did, believe it or not, have four of these in our shelter. Will never ever forget those days before having one of sheltering indoors under the stairs and listening to that irregular drone of those plane engines, the crash and bang of bombs and the AA shells bursting in the sky,I can only describe the sound of these as "crump" "crump". very scary as a kid. Having got an Anderson we spent many nights during the blitz in it and I can always remember that large jug of hot cocoa (popular and indeed mostly all that was available at the time) and some "whatever" sandwiches which went with us into it. Later it was even more used at the time of the doodlebugs and the rockets, V1s and V2s. Had quite a few various nasties drop around us and will never forget crawling out of that Anderson one morning and seeing our house badly damaged,roof half hanging off etc and so much so we were forced to go to Sussex to live with an Aunt until such times as all was made good(ish). Xmas at that time was very bare what with rationing etc and to say nothing of being hard up anyway. Please excuse me banging on but the events then overall are indelibly imprinted on my mind, one could hardly forget them!!. In spite of all that we were one big happy family and the general attitude then amongst people was I think better than that which exists today in spite of all the hardships then current. Regards. Syd.
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Mike Pass 10 December 2006 18:06
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Originally Posted by
Christmases long gone

Quoting: Syd Smith If I may say it all looks a little subdued compared with todays Xmas extremes, and I believe extremes they are. Speaking strictly for myself that then was the way I preferred/prefer it and I personally could well do without this dreadful (I think) commercialism which has taken over today. Sorry if my comments make me sound a bit of a wet blanket but my thoughts are my own which please excuse. Whilst being very grateful about many of todays general improvements in our way of life sadly it seems to me the old comraderie and "shareability" (to possibly coin a new word) are lacking and theres far to much of the "I'm alright Jack attitude about". It's me age mate so do please bear with me, the expression "Hard up but happy" comes very much to mind about those days. Syd, be warned, I get extremely angry when people start apologising for their nostalgia and the desire to bring back many of the aspects of life half a century and more past. I totally agree with your sentiments and, when as often happens younger folk say to me "Stop moaning about the so called good old days, they cant have been that good" I say "Why the hell should I and, yes they were" Yes, of course they was hardship and poverty; even at the start of the 50s when I was dragged out kicking and screaming into the world. I am aware there were murders and many other evil crimes, but, no matter what any rapist or low life druggie tells you, they were not on the scale that they are today. Back in the first half of the 20th century people helped each other and looked after each other as best they could. Even as a child I remember feeling a safe warmth in many of the places I went and things that I did. "Oh yes, we could leave our doors open then!" Yes damn it we could, and my mother usually did. In retrospect perhaps it wasnt too clever but, we never lost anything (did we have anything worth stealing?....maybe not) but she and I have often returned from town shopping to find one of several neighbours brewing up in our kitchen as she had a good idea of what time would be back!! Syd, I heartily embrace new technology and whenever the pocket allows I avail myself of whatever I can (within reason obviously) but, I scream out (metaphorically) for the days of my childhood, not, mark you to be a child again but just to have those days back Sorry about that folks (hypocrite!) but this is one of my favourite rants. I posted these photos not only for everyones amusement and reverie but, also to invite anecdotes such as the Anderson tales. I am thoroughly enjoying them so please do not stop. They do not need to be all about shelters of course (unless we have and Anderson anorak amongst us!) All tales of childhood Christmas would be welcome. Where is Old Zealand????!!!!!
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Mike Pass 10 December 2006 18:24
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: Terry Carey [I] There was one night when me and my Dad /I] One night when my father and I......!! When we say "our mind wanders", where does it go????!!!!!!
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(Unknown Name) 10 December 2006 18:43
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Originally Posted by
Where is Old Zealand????!!!!! In Holland! New Zealand was named by a Dutchman by the name of Abel Tasman, who saw the land but never landed. He also, of course, named the strip of water between NZ and Australia the Tasman Sea, but which is more often than not refrred to as the ditch. We live in different times, thats for sure. My mother died on my seventh birthday, in 1947, but I recall being given clothing and meals and all sorts of help over the next few years by women who I thought were aunts and uncles, and indeed they were referred to as just that. It was many years later before I realised they werent related at all, but just neighbours and friends of my mother. The house was never locked but the front door, which was never used in any avent, had a key attached to a string and hung inside the letterbox slot, and everyone did it and everyone knew it! One other thing about the Anderson. They became castles,cavalry forts,German positions, and everything in our imaginations after the war. We blew them up, bombed them, attacked them from every angle imaginable, and somehow always defeated the Germans defending them.It reached the stage where kids protested at always being a German "because they always lose". One near us was used as a cinema by one enterprising kid, and I can recall my first experience of it as staring the whole time at the projector when I should have been looking at the white sheet which was the screen.
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Not So Long Ago! 11 December 2006 00:54
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Originally Posted by
I posted these photos not only for everyones amusement and reverie but, also to invite anecdotes such as the Anderson tales. I am thoroughly enjoying them so please do not stop. They do not need to be all about shelters of course (unless we have and Anderson anorak amongst us!) All tales of childhood Christmas would be welcome. Where is Old Zealand????!!!!! [/I][/QUOTE] Mick, looking at that photo, you havent changed one bit! But what you say is very true. I still remember the old days with fondness, even though as you say, there was a lot of poverty and hardship. We were still happy and appreciative. I remember people leaving their suitcases etc on the platform at the railway station whilst they went into the cafe for a cuppa and when they came back they were still there. Now if nobody steals it, they would destroy it for fear it might contain explosives! Kids used to play in the parks or on the streets and they werent all chubby from sitting in front of TVs or computers all day, they burnt all their energy running around playing physical games, they interacted and made friends. Modern technology has a lot to answer for! Last edited by Ron Johnston
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Fatch 11 December 2006 09:33
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Originally Posted by
Christmases long gone

I was the 10th of thirteen children (no television those days) we lived in an old farm house, one room downstairs, with two large and one small bedroom. When I was six years old two of my sisters, two of my brothers and myself were evacuated to Whitby, whilst we were there,we saw the first German plane brought down in England. When we returned home, the School I attended received a direct hit, so we were moved about until they organized a new school for us all. however the worst thing was my older sister telling me there was no Santa Clause
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Terry Carey 11 December 2006 15:07
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Originally Posted by
Christmases long gone.

As usual we are seeing diversions from the main thread here but its interesting stuff anyway. Colin, (The good looking one - self confessed of course) Youve got in first on where is Old Zealand simply because Im not getting notifications as I should - a problem which seems to happen to us now and again. Well it does to me. Its that fellow Mick Pass whos responsible Ill bet. Hes probably found a way to confound me. Furthermore he has the audacity to quote me and use it against me. Right, Mr Pass, when I see you it will be cream buns at ten paces. If I want to say (write) me and my Dad Ill jolly well do it - so there. An Irish family, the Mannings, living near us were like most of us on the Council Estate quite poor. However, (NB - Mr Pass - the comma is alive and well and safe in my hands.) the boys in the family were not treated as well as the girls. The girls always got individual presents and as expensive as the parents could afford. Mrs Manning was quite dominant and the husband left everything to her so the boys complained in vain to him. For their presents (?) one year they got a cowboy outfit between them with the instruction that they were to pass around the various bits and pieces so one day one would have the gunbelt, another the guns, a third the hat and the youngest usually got the neckerchief. Quite a sight to see them making up their own posse equipped like that. Does anyone else recall that ALL Christmases in those days were White. They werent really but its just how I remember them. Terry.
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Smudge 11 December 2006 16:41
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Originally Posted by
Those Xmases and related things.

Hi Mick. Great comments from you and please do not get annoyed at my nostalgic references, I have to admit that I do tend to live in the past a lot but must say its mainly due the the fact that in spite of all the hardships, and believe me as one of a large family and Father away in the RAF there were many. Its very obvious to me that thee and I are very much on the same wavelength and experienced a lot of the same. I arrived earlier in this world than yourself, that is to say in 34 and so was just 5 years old at the commencement of WW2. All of us have the greatest admiration and rerspect for those who experienced the bombings,and later the the V1s and V2s in London and all those other Cities that had them. With ref to the comment about wandering away from the main theme. The whole idea of creating and starting a topic is to me not only to pursue the main subject/title but also to draw in all the asides and any other connected and even remote details, hence the mention of Anderson Shelter does to me inevitably bring into play and make totally relevant any comments related thereto. Since these were current in WW2 any experiences one had that were involved with these is totally relevant comment as far as I am concerned. I like others,have a whole barrow full of experiences from that time but the overall thing was as Mick said, even though we were hard up in those days I personally believe there was a far better attitude prevailing generally, maybe the circumstances dictated this. My comments as always are for the sake of conversation and no offence is meant at all to anyone. Regards. Syd.
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Mike Pass 11 December 2006 20:04
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Originally Posted by
Christmases long gone

Quoting: Syd Smith Hi Mick. Great comments from you and please do not get annoyed at my nostalgic references, My anger is pseudo Syd and refers to the necessity of apologising for that which is most definately your birthright. Nostalgia is one of the few things that keeps many of us going! My comments as always are for the sake of conversation and no offence is meant at all to anyone. Regards. Syd. I think you will find that T. Carey Esq. is basically having a go at me Syd. I tend to let it go as it keeps him from bothering the doctor on a regualar basis and, we find it amusing anyway! Regards Mike...... I had barely put the full stop to the Old Zealand poser when I realised my faux pas......Still, even I cant be right all the time. I concede this one. Pax. Why isnt phonetic spelled the way it sounds?????!!!!!
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Mike Pass 11 December 2006 20:16
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Originally Posted by
Christmases long gone

Back to kiddy Christmas then troops (with lots of shelters and the like thrown in hehehehe) A wonderful memory for me was the fabricating of Christmas decorations at school. Remember those lanterns that were made by forming a cylinder of paper after you had folded it half and cut along at short intervals. When formed it sort of bellied out in the middle (this is easier to do than to say!) Then, who can forget the paper links. Having cut strips of paper they were linked and glued together. My record length for this was 16ft until my girlfriend of the time (allegedly) trashed it! Yes Terry comma I always remember Christmases, nay Winters that were white. It never did seem quite so cold though, and I do not mean that from an ageing point of view. I feel it is down to areas of the climate cycle. Is the nose the scenter of the face???!!!
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(Unknown Name) 11 December 2006 20:30
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Originally Posted by
If, however....

....you want to start a sentence with however........not in the JSP of Service Writing! Syd, we raggy-arsed rovers had much in common, no matter which part of the country we lived in. Those Christmas times as kids when we had very little, but also had no tv so we werent aware that we were poor and therefore didnt care! My memories after my mother died on my 7th birthday are of wonderful people who really cared. Whatever our situation, there were always kids worse off whom we thought were really poor.To me, Xmas as a kid were always times of promise, and fun, and crisp mornings, and "A Christmas Carol" at the "Cosy" cinema where one of our mates used to sneak in and open the fire door once the lights had gone out so the rest of us could sneak in too. Xmas was starting a slide on the frost on the footpath until someone came out and poured salt onto it before one of us was killed. It was waking up on Xmas Day to find a half a Mars Bar, or worse, one cut into three pieces, but we didnt care. Thats the way it was. It was going out that morning and seeing the better off kids who had bikes or, wonder of wonders, a bike with a bell on it! Funnily enough, I dont ever recall a White Xmas, although I do remember that terrible winter of 1947, with huge snowdrifts in the streets, and half-way up the front door. No central heating of course, but we were given one of the cast-iron shelves out of the oven, wrapped in a towel and placed in your bed. There was still frozen condensation on the inside of the windows. I tell you, when I went to square-bashin in the RAF I could have done it standing on my ear!
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Mike Pass 11 December 2006 20:36
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: Colin Hall ... I tell you, when I went to 'square-bashin' in the RAF I could have done it standing on my ear! An curious skill Colin, and one I would learn more of......perhaps a diagram??
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(Unknown Name) 11 December 2006 20:44
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Originally Posted by
Not now Mick; as the saying goes "'ear today, gone tomorrow"! Thread drift is a natural phenomenon by the way.I've been on the 'net' for 12 years or so, and on every site such as this it occurs for the very simple reason that our minds aren't compartmental, and for the most part those of us who are really up to speed with the English language, that is; most people north of West Hartlepool, accept that different phrases trigger different response to the same question. Which was?   Last edited by Colin Hall Last edited by Colin Hall
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Syd Jones 12 December 2006 13:26
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Originally Posted by
Enjoyed seeing the photographs Mick. The registration no. of the combo in Pt 4 reminded me of my first bike, a 1932 Panther, reg. no. GO2299. Bought in a crashed state for £5.00 late in 1945. All my Christmas earnings from working at the Post office, Christmas presents, Selling off old railway sets etc. went on rebuilding it. I must have worn a groove between home and Vale Onslows at Deritend in Brum.! Wolverhampton was lucky all through the blitz and had very few bombs. We didnt have an Anderson shelter either, I think the Old Chap preferred his Chrysanthemums, on rare occasions we sat under the stairs. Eventually we had a Morrison table shelter which I dont think was ever used! As I said, We were lucky. Before the war there were strictly determined seasons for various street activities and woe betide any young Erbut who brought his whip & top out a week too soon. Marbles were always played along a gutter rather than a pavement but anywhere fairly flat in the school playground. Any kid who played with Glarnies and tried to settle his losses with mere marbles was in dead trouble! Hoops were old tyres and the game was to knock over everyones tyre. Winner Last man standing. Winter favourite was fire cans Holes would be knocked in a tin can, a loop of wire threaded through the top so that it could be carried around and a fire lit in it! Imagine a gang of kids running about the street, swinging these things round their heads. The intricacy of the swing deciding the leader for the day! Finally when the the coals or whatever had burned to a glow, we would sit around them in some alley, gossiping away like so many little old nightwatchmen and roast (burn) whatever we had purloined from home, garden or anyone elses garden come to that! Our ages? six or seven perhaps. How on earth did we survive? Cheers, Syd.
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Terry Carey 12 December 2006 17:53
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Originally Posted by
Christmases long gone.

Hi all, Well this is turning out to be a great little thread - full of nostalgia and wonderful memories. Like many others it is digressing for hoops, marbles and other old pastimes were for the spring, summer or autumn. The tins with holes and flammable material which we swung round until the contents were glowing brightly were wonderful hand warmers and sufficed us until we got a pair of gloves. Or until we grew up and discovered girls. Remember how snowballs often stuck to the woolly ones - gloves of course, not girls - and by the time you shook them loose your target had beggared off? Or of course made one himself and slung it at you in retribution for that which had not actually happened. As an aside I see that once again that master of vilification Mick Pass is putting it round that I am less than perfect. As we all know on here if I am not perfect then I am very close to it - even if I DID say me and my Dad. Anyway my Doctor understands me perfectly - hes in the next cell but he hasnt got such a comfy padded one as me. As to doing something standing on ones ear Ive never seen it done. Is it like the Indian Rope Trick? Often quoted, never noted. Another trick with two empty tin cans was a small hole in the bottom of two of them with a connecting piece of string, knotted after threading them through the holes. When the string was pulled tightly enough, by speaking into the tin at one end, our voices could travel along the string at least - oh lets see, about 3 or 4 feet. Strange how we always got the messages. Terry. Why be awkward when with a little more effort you can be impossible?
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Handle Oval Balls With Care. 12 December 2006 18:34
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Originally Posted by
I agree with you Terry,it is a great thread to read,and what is more amazing,is the same antics we all got up to,and the similarity throughout the country,when there was not the same media information to inform us what was the trend. Getting the same kind of xmas presents,a tangerine and part bar of chocolate,a wooden fort with a few lead soldiers. I was one of five and my father passing away when I was 11 years old,so things were very tight for my mother,but she always came up trumps,with sadly not much appreciation from us. The winter of 47,when the older lads built a igloo in the street.Building a bonfire,and going out on bonfire raids in other parts of the town,and leaving a couple of kids to guard your own,only to come back from a raid,to find they had been called in by their mothers,and your bonfire burning. Standing in the middle of the street with an old dustbin lid for a sheild,and throwing stones at each other. Happy days.
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Mike Pass 12 December 2006 19:09
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Originally Posted by
Quoting: Terry Carey  As we all know on here if I am not perfect then I am very close to it .   Strange Terry, I didnt see you when I last turned around hohohoho! Mike, my father made many of my toys including a fort and a garage out of a rather strange composite type board about 3/16" thick. It had a rather unusual smell also. I enjoyed playing with both although, the fort did not lead me into the Army (not that I would have had a problem with that as I was determined to get into one arm as soon as possible anyway). The garage did not lead me to becoming a mechanic and that is something that I do regret. I could have saved a fortune!!! What kind of fruit is in Juicy Fruit gum????!!!
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(Unknown Name) 13 December 2006 01:22
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Originally Posted by
Gloves? WOOLLEN gloves? Snowballing wearing GLOVES???? What part of County Wimp did you live in lad? You wore nothing on your hands; that would have affected the smooth departure and subsequent trajectory of the snowball, so you did it barefoot, or rather bare-handed; until you could no longer feel your hands. Southern jessies......... In my small town, it was extremely rare to see a Council house with a gate. Those that did,had wisely removed them on bonfire night lest they end up the same way as most others,on a fire. You needed those very hot coals at the bottom of the fire you see, to roast the spuds youd nicked from the nearest farm paddock or your Mum, and shoved into the fire on the end of a stick, which invariably burnt though, leaving your spud a blackened ball. Still, when you got it out, and tried to peel off the charcoal skin while constantly tossing it from one hand to the other, it tasted great except for the fact that it burnt your mouth and you had to run around fanning air into your burnt mouth with your burnt hands. Gee but it was fun. We should all have been certified. There were things you did at Xmas, and things you did at other times of the year, but only at those times. There were seasons; for marbles, for conkers, for blackberrying,potato-picking; for stealing fruit from every orchard and presbytery in a well-plotted area you knew like the back of your hand. I recall stealing pears from a Catholic-owned tree while two of the parish priests held a conversation underneath.SAS? we could have taught that lot a thing or to about concealment, and WE never got caught!
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(Unknown Name) 13 December 2006 01:52
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Originally Posted by
Lend me your ears.

I can see that I need to explain [sigh]why standing on one's ear imparts a degree of difficulty, or ease, to a given task. It all started with Bill Shakespeare you see, that well-known Geordie. He penned [or quilled, whatever]that famous speech: "Friends, Romans, Countrymen, lend me your ears", and when the play it was in first appeared, he , being so popular, was embarrassed by the bags of ears that were thrown at him on stage at The Globe. Nevertheless, being enterprising as well as well-writ, he found a use for those ears, by taking them to a purse and hand-bag maker and saying thus; "'ear, 'ave I got a deal for you, please turn these into a silk purse". The job would have a degree of difficulty you see, hence the saying " An ear,an ear, my Kingdom for an ear", subsequently changed over the years to "Standing on my ear". To Old Bill, Shakespeare that is, it was largely 'all Greek to him', but he always acted more in sorrow than anger in being father to the thought, especially when his ear purse vanished into thin air due to someone suffering green-eyed jealousy and playing fast and loose.Bill never stood on ceremony however, and despite not sleeping a wink. he simply knitted his brow and made a virtue out of necessity and laughed himself into stitches.He never bothered with cold comfort or too much of a good thing, and had seen better days, so he he said, "be that as it may", and forgot it. Anything else you want to know? Last edited by Colin Hall
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Mike Pass 13 December 2006 19:59
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Originally Posted by
[QUOTE]Quoting: Colin Hall [I] Anything else you want to know? Oh Yes indeedy cocker. The budgie rustler and I (notice the personal pronoun taking the latter position in the sentence Terry...as in my father and I!) are not, at this point particularly interested in the bards ramblings. We require comma nay demand an authenticated photograph of described stunt, i.e. standing on your ear. Futhermore, in order to give said demonstration a more seasonal feel, I would suggest that it is performed in a Santa suit. We await your offering with clenched knees....... Why is that only adults have difficulties with child-proof bottles???!!!
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(Unknown Name) 13 December 2006 21:17
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Originally Posted by
The trouble is.....if I stand on my ear...either ear..I will have a slight tilt to port or starboard, and as I will also be inverted, my Santa beard will fall down and cover my face and ears. You will therefore not only be unable to see what you want to see, [unless it's my bare arse ], but my rendition of "How Great Thow Art" will be somewhat muffled. Last edited by Colin Hall
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Lou 13 December 2006 21:29
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Originally Posted by
Lucky

Wow, looking through those pictures make me realise just how flamin lucky i am ! Hurrahh to the parents for deciding to have me when they did !!!
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Terry Carey 14 December 2006 15:44
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Originally Posted by
Christmases long gone.

Colin, Much as I enjoy reading your missives and banter the last thing I want to see is your bare arse, even if it were to be framed seasonally in holly and mistletoe. Dont take this personally, I mean dont go running into the attic or basement for a good weep, Id feel the same if it were Mick Passs or any other male on earth. Now if it were that of a female of the species then that would be a different matter - entirely depending on the arse of course. Reverting to a previous post where Southern Jessies are mentioned Ill have you know Im from what is generally regarded as the frozen North by said southern Jessies. I cant help it if I was comparitively posh - ie we had shoes not clogs and had a fresh sheet of newspaper for a tablecloth EVERY day. We wore gloves if we had them providing we still had all our fingers. Thats probably why I still have them all. I actually know a bloke who can stand on his ear - well, it is a prosthetic ear and he once won a bet in a pub because of it. One chap bet that he could bite his own ear and once the money was down took out his false teeth and nipped his ear with them. My pal said he could beat that and no explanations are now necessary since you are all clever clogs on here. Talking of ears if you want a genuine explanation of the old saying You cant make a silk purse out of a sows ear read on. It comes from the saying You cant make a silk purse out of a sousiere. A sousiere was a piece of rough cloth in which French seamstresses or needleworkers placed their needles for safe keeping whilst working. Unfortunately I have no means of putting on here the appropriate accent over the first letter e in the word sousiere. Truly, I am a mine of useless information albeit lovely with it. Christmas 1949 I spent under the Mediterranean sun (Isnt it really the same one we have here?) and one drunken Rupert climbed onto a tent only to be told by a drunken SSM to get down. This he did by launching himself onto the roof of the tent and then landed face down in the sand where he promptly went to sleep. We left him there of course. Thats not the full story but when I get my book published you can all read about it. Terry.
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(Unknown Name) 14 December 2006 18:33
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Originally Posted by
...and here I was thinking Mick had an ulterior posterior motive.
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Mike Pass 14 December 2006 20:22
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Originally Posted by
Christmases long gone

Well Tel, I think that we can take that as a general declination or an outing of the chicken, dont you...... It now falls to me to point out the obvious, if not ridiculous fact that as Colin is in NZ he is (generally speaking) on the other side of the planet. Therefore.....???? Come on we dont have all day....he is already standing on his ear (near enuff) as far as we would perceive it! Also let it be said that, if the accepted form of greeting down there is to exhibit ones glutinous maximus then I do not think that I shall be going to visit the Hobbits after all!!!! I promise that I will say something Christmassy next time.... Did Noah keep his two bees in archives???!!!!
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(Unknown Name) 14 December 2006 21:11
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Originally Posted by
Ah, but we are not downunder Mick; we are are actually on top of the world, and you lot are on the bottom. Periodically,like every half million years or so, the earths polarity reverses. Im serious about this; if you dont believe me go and ask your nearest magnetohydrodynamicsit. We have trees in NZ known as NZ Christmas trees, because they only flower at Xmas [there you go, Ive inserted Xmas into the theme]. So when this polarity reversal takes place just think of the problems birds have. Countless Canada geese, sooty shearwaters, and other migratory birds who rely on the magnetic field being more or less constant, will have their summer holidays ruined. A real bad-feather day you might say. Just think of it, there you are, a perfectly well-adjusted lesser spotted dotterel, happily on your way to Vladivostok, when bang, the earths polarity shifts, and you touch down in Hawaii. The UK Government under Brown would have to set up a Polarity Reversal Investigatory Commission {PRIC], and employ hordes of supervisors {PRICS] with spinning compass needles attached to their heads.Well all be singing "South To Alaska", and the Southern Cross will become the Northern Cross, though no one will ever see it in England due to the haze! In NZ, well simply open another bottle and say "shell be right mate" and carry on.
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(Unknown Name) 16 December 2006 00:21
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Originally Posted by
You should be aware Mick, that I dont do rejection very well...... Its Saturday morning, and as England are getting thumped by the Skippies in the Ashes [again], as is NZ by Sri Lanka in another test of stamina; {not that of the players, but those watching], my interest has been diverted by the arrival of our Xmas Tree. Its a real one, none of this ersatz plastic in this house, and the smell of pine is circulating around the house. The next thing will be the arrival of the four grandkids to "help apply the lights and decorations. We already have a list of what we have to take to the Xmas lunch, this year at a nephews house, and for some reason or another Im on new potatoes. I used to grow my own when we owned the land behind our house, but stopped when we sold that about 12-15 years ago. We nevertheless, for years, had a late Aunt of my wifes who always said, "and thank Colin for the new potatoes". I never had the nerve to tell her they were bought ones. Come Xmas Day, well have the Barbecue going, and well all eat and drink far too much. My son-in-law, as with all Kiwi rugby supporters, will invariably burst into song at some stage, though I long ago reached the conclusion that none of us can sing,even fewer know any words, and all the songs end up sounding roughly like "Blue Suede Shoes". Its hard to tell. Which leads me to my second theme of Xmas. You realise. on glancing around the Christmas dinner table, that your family gene pool is more like a swamp than a pool. Our kids have all done well, none of them raced off to join the Foreign Legion, or became axe murderers, so I guess were blessed. Howm I doing Mick?
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Mike Pass 16 December 2006 12:06
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Originally Posted by
Christmases long gone

Very well indeed Cocker. However, we are still awaiting the phots of aforementiond stunt (preferably without the moon feature!) Whose cruel idea was it for the word lisp to have an s in it????!!!!
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Terry Carey 16 December 2006 13:51
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Originally Posted by
Christmases long gone.

Ah - the smell of a real Christmas tree. The delicate odour of pine permeating the ambience of a warm, cosy family home. Oh the delights on the day after Twelfth Night trying to get the bl**dy thing outside before ALL the needles fall off. And, (bad form I know - starting a sentence with a preposition) the joys of finding the perishers working their way into and subsequently out of the carpet for months afterwards. The euphoria of walking around barefoot and finding one that youve missed impaling your big toe cause you didnt see it. Christmas Humbug
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(Unknown Name) 17 December 2006 03:33
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Originally Posted by
I've been thinking Terry, not always a good thing, and I note that you were 'in' in 1949, which means you have seen ...ohh...a Xmas or three more than me. I was nine in 1949, and you would have been...err, 18?, plus the difference between 1949 and 2006, which is 57, plus 18 which = 70...ish...cough. So...I am at a severe disadvantage here, in that you have seen many more Christmas' past. Well, I mean, you could have been cast for the part of one of those Christmas' in "A Christmas Carol". How was old Charlie Dickens by the way? I had a part in a school play in 1947, my second trip onto "the boards" as it were, [the first being the Usher in Wind in The Willows"]. I played Tiny Tim, presumably because he never gets to say much other than "God bless us, everyone!" I vowed from that day on to make up for it! Last edited by Colin Hall
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Sit Vis Nobiscum. 17 December 2006 08:03
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Originally Posted by
"I played Tiny Tim, presumably because he never gets to say much other than "God bless us, everyone!" No chance of type-casting there then
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(Unknown Name) 18 December 2006 06:01
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Originally Posted by
Nope, Im looking for a Father Xmas role now; hes bifgger than god!
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Terry Carey 18 December 2006 21:13
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Originally Posted by
Christmases long gone......

Okay Colin H, So youre good at maths. Okay if you must know - make a note of this date for next year when I still plan to be around - 11th September 1930. Ill expect a card - E-card will do - and at least a photo of a bar of chocolate just to make Mick Pass jealous. Him and his blasted aeroplane. Okay Ive seen a few Christmases more than you - and before Mick gets his oar in - yes Ive seen more than most people. I was in a Sunday School play as one of a group of soldiers with us all dressed in bright red tunics, black trousers and pill box hats. The cast was made up of some from Sunday School and some from the church choir so I was doubly qualified. The vicar had the bright idea of arranging us all in a line increasing in height as we came on the stage, each one with his hand on the preceding lads shoulder. Then he had the further bright idea of sticking me at the back behind a lad (?) called Stanley Corbishley who was about 6 2" with me, a tiny eight year old vainly trying to reach high enough to touch Stanleys shoulder AND keep up with the rest. The roar of laughter which greeted my appearance made me stop and pull out my tongue at the audience in anger. It was then I realised that I could make people laugh as I stood there basking in momentary glory and my anger went out of the window. I took my time about moving as the vicar yelled at me to catch the others up and, before moving, pulled another couple of faces which had the same effect. Oh the power! That feeling I think was what stayed with me until I eventually took to the boards as a singer - I didnt have the confidence at first to work just as a comedian although later I worked as either singer or comic. The next Christmas I was one of the shepherds as I dont think the vicar really trusted me unless I was more or less inconspicuous. Less rather than more I think was his reasoning. Terry.
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Mike Pass 18 December 2006 21:33
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Originally Posted by
Chrsitmases long ago

Quoting: Terry Carey   The next Christmas I was one of the shepherds Now there's a thing, in '84 I gave my 2nd shepherd/Victorian palace guard at the first of four musicals at the Wolverhampton Grand theatre. The next Christmas I gave my palace butler/42nd St. hoofer. In '86 I gave my Cossack horseman/Owl Finally in '88 I gave my WWII German stormtrooper/Edwardian lounge lizard. In '89 I gave my resignation!!!! The point is...who is doing the bl*ody casting these days?????!!! N.B. I tried to post National Socialist extremist soldier above but the system wouldn't let me use the accepted four letter abv!!!! Ergo German etc. Is duck tape made out of ducks????!!!! Last edited by Mick Pass
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